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-   -   New Drywall Installation, 1 joint screws are popping (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/new-drywall-installation-1-joint-screws-popping-33842/)

zjowens 12-15-2008 11:29 PM

New Drywall Installation, 1 joint screws are popping
 
I just put 5/8 sheetrock up on the ceiling in a bathroom I am remodling on 24" centers. I am getting close to taping and went back and looked at it after it sat a few weeeks and one side of one joint seems to have buldged out the screws a bit. I have 18" of blown in insulation above it but was very careful not to get any in between the joists and the new drywall. I put extra screws in (almost 4-5" spacing). Anyone have any suggestions on how to fix it? Does the piece need to come down and be replaced or can it be fixed hopefully? The bathroom is 10'x10' but only about 5 feet of one piece seems to have this problem. I added more screws in so have screws about every 2" through this area now. After the new screws were in I could here the sheetrock moving (not cracking per say) but making noise. Any ideas?

Termite 12-15-2008 11:39 PM

Sounds like there might have been some unseen damage to the sheetrock in that area. Probably need to remove it an re-hang a new piece.

24" centers is pretty far apart, so having good solid sheetrock is critical.

Be careful that the screws aren't being overdriven. If they break the paper face of the rock, they're of no value.

zjowens 12-16-2008 09:21 AM

thanks
 
Most of the screws did not break the paper but just buldged out around the screw head. Two other things came to mind. House is in Minnesota and we have recently had -15 degrees F days. I do remember this piece being a very snug fit in this area when I installed it. Could that have something to do with it as well?

I am guessing there is no good repair to the existing piece now?

Termite 12-16-2008 10:23 AM

The drywall is bulging around the screw heads? Did you use a drywall dimple bit or just a regular screwdriver bit?

Can you post a picture?

I doubt this is weather related.

zjowens 12-16-2008 10:34 AM

just a regular bit. This was actually the most complicated piece I have ever put up. After messing around in the attic for the electrical, the insulation had sagged some so I had to preset almost all of the outside screws on the sheet before driving them all the way in. So I basically slowly brough the sheet up with the screws to prevent snapping the drywall or popping the screws out. Again, when I left it a month ago it all looked good. Now there are noticable bulges around the screws. I will post some pictures tonight...

cocobolo 12-16-2008 06:02 PM

A proper drywall bit would have been helpful, as it releases itself from the screw at the right time and does not overdrive the screw. If your drywall was tight, that may well be the cause of the problem. Next time, you could try to put the screws in pairs, that is to say two screws about 1 1/2" apart on about 8" centers. I expect you have used the water resistant drywall, since this is a bathroom.
I think I might be inclined to remove it and start over, drywall is cheap.

AtlanticWBConst. 12-16-2008 07:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zjowens (Post 198776)
just a regular bit. This was actually the most complicated piece I have ever put up. After messing around in the attic for the electrical, the insulation had sagged some so I had to preset almost all of the outside screws on the sheet before driving them all the way in. So I basically slowly brough the sheet up with the screws to prevent snapping the drywall or popping the screws out. Again, when I left it a month ago it all looked good. Now there are noticable bulges around the screws. I will post some pictures tonight...

The bulges are from the paper around the screws giving way, and the sheet is starting to come back down again. You may have to locate the joists on either side of that seam, draw out an area. Then cut the sheet back to the next joist on either side. Replace the area with new sheetrock, and this time use a drywall screw gun, or a drywall attachment on the drill.

Additionally, before you install the new section of sheetrock, check to see if that joist is flush and even with the surrounding joists (use a straight edge). If not, you may have to shim it to align with the others. That would help reduce the chances of the new screws popping thru.

cocobolo 12-16-2008 11:07 PM

Another thought just came to mind after reading the previous post. Since your joists are on 24" centers, perhaps it would be worth it to strap the ceiling on 16" centers. You could shim the strapping so it was even without too much difficulty. Just a thought.

Wethead 12-17-2008 03:48 AM

Its sounds like your going to have to just replace that board for sure, I men I would,

zjowens 12-17-2008 09:12 AM

Thanks for all the comments. Did not get a chance to post pictures yesterday, will do it tonight. Sounds like the problem is the board is coming down though. With this being a difficult piece to replace with multiple cutouts and the wall board already up, what do you guys think of this solution - Go up in the attic and screw a 2x4 into the existing joist next to the edge that is starting to fail. Drive a new line of screws into the sheetrock 1" farther in from the original line of screws.

cocobolo 12-17-2008 01:35 PM

Well, I guess if replacement is not practical, then sistering the ceiling joist might well be a viable alternative. I think you will have to screw the sister boards on to the existing joists, because if you try to nail them, the movement of the joists when you smack the nails in will only do more damage. One advantage of the sistering which you suggest, is that the new boards can just lay completely flush with the top of your drywall. Can I suggest that you get very straight boards to do the sistering with. That way you will get a nice flat ceiling. It might even pay you to take a few minutes and run some boards through your tablesaw. I expect you know the trick of temporarily tacking a strip of plywood onto a board to get a straight cut? If not, just ask.

RocketRon 12-17-2008 05:26 PM

Did you glue the drywall before screwing it?

Sir MixAlot 12-17-2008 08:26 PM

Carefully take down the suspect sheet of drywall. Then lay it down on a new sheet of drywall and trace out all of the cutouts. Recut. Re-evaluate the framing and insulation. Make adjustments as needed. Install new sheet of drywall.:yes:

zjowens 12-18-2008 09:20 AM

pictures
 
3 Attachment(s)
Here are some pictures. This was a weird joint to begin with. I have 1/2" green board above the tub with extra support and the white board is 5/8". You can see that the green board is fine but the white is where I am haveing the issue. Again, when I put it up, the screws on the white board looked like the ones on the green board. In the third picture you can see the end of each board and the wall face. I forgot to put a straight edge up but it sure looks like that joist may be higher then the rest? That would explain why these screws may be popping since the board is under tension?

AtlanticWBConst. 12-18-2008 10:33 AM

Issue # 1: You left this little important detail out in your earlier posts; You are using two different thickness sheetrock and butting them up to each other: Mistake (no-no). They should both be either 1/2" or 5/8".

Issue # 2: It appears that the ceiling joists are not aligned. Picture # 3 shows that clearly. The sheetrock surfaces should not dip up as they do in the pic.


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