Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Drywall & Plaster

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-27-2012, 01:35 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 141
Share |
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


We have some mold from a leak from small apartment with some stairs that had cracks in them and the water leaked into the wall beneath the stairs. There is a closet to a master bedroom underneath these stairs.

The wall had some mold smell and a few mold spots. I cleaned the wall with bleach and a mold remover.

The stairs have been sealed with cement/fiberglass water proofing above the room with the mold.

I was wondering if I should remove the drywall as this could open up all those mold spores, Or if I should just cover the wall with primer/ paint so the mold doesn't come through.

I figure I could just paint/ cover it up since there will be no more water getting into the wall. Also, I don't want to open up the drywall and breath all that in.

What do you all think?


Last edited by crayola110; 10-01-2012 at 07:11 PM. Reason: Wall broke and mold is inside closet/ room
crayola110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 02:30 PM   #2
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,842
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


How big is the area? Has it completely dried? How long was it wet? How solid is the drywall right now?

FYI: Spores are not the only possible allergenic produced by molds.

Maintenance 6 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 03:56 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 141
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 View Post
How big is the area? Has it completely dried? How long was it wet? How solid is the drywall right now?

FYI: Spores are not the only possible allergenic produced by molds.
It's an area of about 3 ft by 4 ft
It's been dried for a while. Probably dry for 5 months at least.
It was wet from rain getting in through cracks in the exterior staircase. Now the exterior has been sealed with fiberglass waterproofer so no water should be getting in.
The drywall feels pretty much intact. It's a little brittle in some places.
When had I cleaned the mold off of it about 5 months ago, it just wiped right off and there are just a couple spots that show paint coming off.

Thank you

Last edited by crayola110; 09-27-2012 at 04:41 PM.
crayola110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2012, 02:13 PM   #4
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,842
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


If the drywall is solid enough that you don't want to replace it, then coat it with a stainblocker and repaint. There is probably mold on the inside surfaces, but it's such a small area, that I would be inclined to leave it.
Maintenance 6 is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Maintenance 6 For This Useful Post:
crayola110 (10-01-2012)
Old 10-01-2012, 02:40 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 141
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


Yeah I think i'll just leave it then... i don't want to create a big job and I'm not mold expert

Hopefully I don't get sick... LOL
crayola110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 03:31 PM   #6
Member
 
GBrackins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Posts: 2,831
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


if you find yourself waking up in the morning really coughing and congested, and it goes away after your leave your home you'll have your answer ......
__________________
Gary

"You get what you pay for, and sometimes free costs more!"
GBrackins is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 03:45 PM   #7
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,842
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


If it hasn't happened in the past 5 months, being unsealed, I doubt it's gonna make a big difference now!
Maintenance 6 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 03:56 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 141
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


Yeah I think I was just being paranoid. They just opened the stairs up on the other side so I saw a lot of mold in there. Then they sealed the stairs. On my side it's just the drywall which feels pretty intact.
I'll just paint over it several layers of paint to seal it off
crayola110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 06:49 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 141
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


UPDATE:

Guy's so I was pushing on the wall to test it out and broke a hole about 2 feet by 1 foot. It's in a bedroom closet beneath some stairs where the leak occured about 5 months or so ago. Now there is a moldy musty smell and I've created a bigger proble... :-/

I guess I do need to replace the drywall... because it IS brittle.

So does anyone have any suggestions as to the best way to do this without messing it up too much and spreading these spores.

The total wall space is about 4 feet by 3 feet

Also the drywall/ mold got all over the closet because I started breaking peices off... I'm kinda stupid but now there is dust all over I am guessing I can vacuum this with a HEPA filter? Would that be sufficient?

Last edited by crayola110; 10-01-2012 at 07:10 PM. Reason: I'm dumb
crayola110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2012, 08:22 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: outside ocala fl
Posts: 3,342
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


Crayola in my opinion you are playing with FIRE here if I am correct (and I may not be) there are something like 1200 different kinds of mold. Some are very toxic and can do incredible damage to us. Just because you couldn't see the mold inside the wall doesn't mean it quit growing. If it is inside the wall it has the paper from both walls (on the back of the drywall) to feed on plus the wood I would at the least close that room off if possible. Probably the best thing you could do is leave the house till you get someone to look at this. I don't know how old you are or if you have children but some molds can cause irrefutable damage. You cannot just vac, the mold must be killed in the wall cavity. PLEASE call in a company that deals with mold to at least look at the situation. And no bleach does NOT kill most mold.
ToolSeeker is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ToolSeeker For This Useful Post:
crayola110 (10-02-2012)
Old 10-02-2012, 12:37 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 141
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


Thanks for your reply, unfortunately I don't have the money to hire mold specialists, I know they're expensive.

Also the area is only about 1 foot where it broke. I actually tapped it pretty hard with a hammer then kept pulling at it. There's mold, but it doesn't seem that bad, plus the area will be completely dry from now on.

Last night I vacummed the area in the closet with hepa vacuum and sprayed/ misted the whole area and inside the wall with Concrobium (http://www.concrobium.com/)
I also got a mold test from home depot and I'm mailing that off today.


I hope this was sufficient because I let it dry over night then drywall patched the area...

I did all this quickly because I felt that I had to close off/ seal off the area. I hope I didn't act too hastily

Supposedly this concrobium binds to mold, crushes and seals it off. I got a lot of it in the wall.

Hopefully the test will come off negative for any hazardous mold. Then I will put 2 coats of Stain Blocker primer and then a couple coats of paint. The area was wet before from water leaking through the exterior stair case above, but from now on should be sealed off from all moisture...

ToolSeeker: Thank you. I think i will still call the mold company just to take a look, but I'm sure they'll say I need to run expensive tests or do some invasive thing like tearing the wall down again etc... I don't have the money to do this, so hopefully I can seal it off good since it will be dry in there from now on

I guess this is all I can do at this point unless anyone else has any suggestions??

Last edited by crayola110; 10-02-2012 at 12:40 PM.
crayola110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 08:43 PM   #12
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,842
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


First of all. You opened it up and of course the spores have permeated everything now, so it's a clean up effort. Don't get all worked up over mold exposure unless you or somebody in your household has some particular disease that would render you susceptible. You've treated and closed it up. The mold test kit is a waste. Of course it will find mold. You had mold. It's gonna find it. Unfortunately, the helpy selfy mold kits will find mold even if it weren't a problem. A true mold test is much more complex than a DIY kit can produce. You've skipped a few steps that really should have been done. Read this thread for a better idea.
Basement Mold. Please Advise.
Maintenance 6 is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Maintenance 6 For This Useful Post:
ToolSeeker (10-04-2012)
Old 10-04-2012, 03:51 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 141
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 View Post
Maintenance, from that post it seems that most mold is not harmful and most issues are exaggerated. I spend about 18-20 hours in that room every day so I don't really want to risk it.

The test that I purchased takes samples in a petri dish then you mail it to a lab. The lab will tell me what strains of mold it is.

Before removing the drywall I looked inside the wall and there is a substantial amount of mold back there like the pictures from Maintenance6's post

I'm thinking what I did just sealed it up, but it could come back through eventually?

I actually worry about long term affects of the mold. I mean its right in the closet next to my bed. I'm in a one room suite and the mildew smell is pretty bad. Also I've been getting head aches but I don't know if this is psychosomatic or an actual physical reaction to the mold.

Am I making too big a deal about it? possibly, but I can't stop thinking about the mold behind the walls. Perhaps it's largely psychological, but I keep thinking about it and can't sleep well at night right now... :-/

Anyways Ive sealed it as I said and vacuumed multiple times.

So I spoke to a contractor I know and he said I should just remove the bad drywall and all the insulation with mold inside. Then, treat all the wood. He said I could DIY, and just to make sure to remove all the mold and treat everything.

Any other ideas or suggestions? Does what the contractor say efficient enough, or do you guys think I should just leave it in the wall covered with paint? Any suggestions on the removal for DIY?

Last edited by crayola110; 10-04-2012 at 04:00 PM. Reason: thanks
crayola110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2012, 11:24 AM   #14
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,842
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


As I said before, you've skipped some steps in remediating the problem. A word about DIY test kits. They ask you to place a collector that mold spores will settle onto. It is treated with a food source that will promote mold growth if spores are present. You send it away and they analyze it. Guess what, it has mold growing on it. It can't tell you what the source is. Some won't even tell you how many colonies have formed. Here's the rub. Mold spores are everywhere. Just walked through dry leaves? You drug a ton of spores into your house. Opened a moldy loaf of bread on your kitchen counter? Tons of mold spores introduced to the air. A realistic mold test involves taking several air samples inside and at least one outside. Then some wipe tests or spore collection for mold type analytics. You've got some mold. The test stage is over. You've visually confirmed it and you are smelling it. If as you've said, you are still smelling it, then it is still active. I don't advocate living around the stuff, only that the effects are being hyped by the media. If you want to get rid of it, then read on. I copied the major points of a previous post below.

First, you need to get an exhaust fan established direct to the outside and pull the airborne mold fragments and spores out. Since you already have had this open, they have been steadily permeating the rest of your home. Next, you need to remove the effected material, bag it and discard it. Paneling, insulation, drywall and trim are not salvageable. What you should have left are structural items that are not easily replaced. Now, the most important part…… you need to control the moisture. Mold needs three things to thrive. An organic food source (wood, paper and dust will do fine). This is pretty much uncontrollable . Temperatures in the range of 40 to 110. Room temperature will do just fine. Finally they need moisture in the range of 60% sustained RH or .6 water content. This is the controllable part. The best remediation effort in the world is for nothing, if the moisture is uncontrolled. Next thing is to scrub down whatever is left with a detergent solution and a scrub brush. Now you are ready to treat. Lots of things kill mold. There are several products out there that make claims one way or another. Phenols, Quaternary Ammonias and Sodium Hypochlorite (bleach) all kill mold. None will penetrate porous surfaces any better than the next (read the fine print). Even the magic mold potions will use one of these compounds, often with a few other “secret ingredients” added. If you choose bleach, use 10% maximum. Thoroughly treat the area going 12 inches past the last signs of mold. Let all of this completely dry. Dehumidify to speed the process if you must. Finally, seal the treated surfaces. A few companies sell sealers specifically for mold work. They usually include a mold inhibiter in their formula, but this isn’t particularly necessary. Kilz or something like it will work fine. The sealer will improve the appearance, but more importantly, it locks down any stray mold fragments or settled spores.
A few more things: No normal, healthy person has ever been documented as having died from mold. That said, wear your respirator anyway. Molds produce some nasty chemical compounds as part of their life cycle, but usually in such small amounts that they have little impact (bread molds are some of the worst). You don’t want to be sucking the crappy stuff into your lungs anyway.
Remember, you are dealing with mold here, not some bulletproof alien. Lots of things will kill it. Almost none of those can be made to penetrate into a porous material and be effective.
The end result is only as good as the diligence you use in performing the work.
Good luck
Maintenance 6 is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Maintenance 6 For This Useful Post:
crayola110 (10-26-2012)
Old 10-26-2012, 10:50 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 141
Default

Mold in Wall from prior leak


Thanks for that thorough reply. I will attempt to do that eventually when I have time, for now I will keep the wall closed off with the paint etc. As I said above, the moisture source has been removed which is the most important part.

Just for everyone's info the mold test I did from PRO-LAB I got at home depot. It gives you the species of mold found from a SPOT test where you scrap the mold. I scrapped it at a couple spots and sent it off here are the results (luckily there was nothing very harmful like 'black mold'):

Quote:
Spore Name Description
ASPERGILLUS VERY COMMON INDOOR AND OUTDOOR MOLD. ONE OF THE MOST COMMON MOLD
TYPES FOUND WORLDWIDE. FOUND ON DECAYING PLANT MATTER, SOIL,
FOODSTUFFS, LEATHER, ETC. RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPE I ALLERGIES (HAY FEVER),
TYPE III HYPERSENSITIVITY PNEUMONITIS, SOME SPECIES THAT ARE CAPABLE OF
GROWING AT BODY TEMPERATURE ARE PATHOGENIC TO HUMANS. CAPABLE OF
PRODUCING TOXINS, BUT TOXIN PRODUCTION DEPENDS UPON THE SUBSTRATE THE
MOLD IS GROWING ON. POTENTIAL OPPORTUNISTIC PATHOGEN. NO SPECIES
IDENTIFICATION HAS BEEN DONE AND THEREFORE, NO DISEASE INFORMATION CAN
BE INFERRED FROM THIS IDENTIFICATION.

CLADOSPORIUM PROBABLY THE MOST COMMON SPORE TYPE IN THE AIR WORLDWIDE. COMMONLY
GROWS ON DEAD OR DYING PLANTS, FOOD, STRAW, AND SOIL. ABLE TO GROW ON
PAINT, TEXTILES, WOOD AND WALLBOARD. IT IS COMMONLY FOUND GROWING ON
THE DUST AND DEBRIS ACCUMULATING ON AIR DUCT VENTS. COMMON CAUSE OF
EXTRINSIC ASTHMA (IMMEDIATE-TYPE HYPERSENSITIVITY: TYPE I).

PENICILLIUM COMMONLY FOUND IN SOIL, FOOD, CELLULOSE, GRAINS, AND MANY OTHER
SUBSTRATES. TYPE I ALLERGIES (HAY FEVER, ASTHMA) AND TYPE III
HYPERSENSITIVITY PNEUMONITIS. CAPABLE OF PRODUCING TOXINS, BUT RARELY
REPORTED AS A HUMAN PATHOGEN

TRICHODERMA FOUND IN A DIVERSITY OF HABITATS. COMMON ON DEAD TREES, PAPER, AND A WIDE
VARIETY OF PRODUCTS. READILY DEGRADES CELLULOSE. TYPE I (HAY FEVER,
ASTHMA) AND TYPE III (HYPERSENSITIVITY PNEUMONITIS). CAPABLE CAUSING
HUMAN DISEASE, ESPECIALLY IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PERSONS.
NON-SPORULATING FUNGI MANY FUNGI DO NOT FORM SPORES USING ROUTINE GROWTH MEDIA AND UNDER
NORMAL GROWTH CONDITIONS IN THE LABORATORY. NON-SPORULATING COLONIES
ARE OFTEN A RESULT OF GERMINATING MUSHROOM SPORES (BASIDIOSPORES).

NON-SPORULATING FUNGI CAN POTENTIALLY BE ALLERGENIC, IRRITATING, OR
CAUSE HYPERSENSITIVITY PNEUMONITIS, AND DERMATITIS.

crayola110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trouble with staggered wall rightit Building & Construction 2 03-09-2011 06:23 PM
Building a half wall: 2 questions kbizzle Carpentry 7 02-19-2011 08:22 AM
Running speaker wire from attic into exterior wall: Techniques? homerb Home Theater 1 07-15-2010 01:55 PM
Repairing interior wall cavity with mold, what would you do? (Pics included) pendlebg General DIY Discussions 4 06-16-2009 03:40 PM
Atlantic-need your opinion on markd's comments about my vapor barrier? yummy mummy Building & Construction 11 03-07-2007 09:47 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.