Is This Level 5? - Drywall & Plaster - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Drywall & Plaster


CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Like Tree3Likes
  • 2 Post By Sir MixAlot
  • 1 Post By chrisn
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-10-2017, 09:27 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 2
Default

Is this level 5?


Howdy. I'm new here.

We purchased a house last year. It was a spec-house, new construction, and we got involved about halfway through the build.

We paid up for level-5 drywall throughout the house.

Initially, it was absolutely stunning. The walls still look great. And many of the smaller rooms look great too. But there are three rooms where the ceiling began to show defects very quickly (like within the first month or so).

The drywall company said they could fix it, so they spent a week re-skim coating the entire ceiling of those rooms (as far as I understand). The result was not good, however. It actually looks significantly worse in our opinion.

So the drywall company said they were understaffed and only had one relatively inexperienced guy working on the fix, and that we should revisit it in 10 months. In 10 months they'd make us happy.

Well, it's 10-months now and the story seems like to might be changing . Now the drywall company is indicating they're expecting to do "normal warranty" work (e.g., fix some popped screws and cracks) -- they are not expecting to a major rework of the ceilings.

The house is still under warranty, so we're obviously going to push back on that. But my question is, do you think these photos are remotely close to level-5? It's not just joint photographing AFAICT. The ceiling is actually uneven if you put a straight-edge across it. You can see the undulations.

And as a secondary question, what do you think would be necessary to address this? Could another skim coat work? One person we talked to indicated it would be easier (and probably cheaper) to "relaminate" the entire thing (put up another layer of drywall).

Any suggestions greatly appreciated.
Attached Thumbnails
Is this level 5?-bedroom.jpg   Is this level 5?-billiard1.jpg   Is this level 5?-billiard2.jpg   Is this level 5?-great-room.jpg   Is this level 5?-great-room2.jpg  

Is this level 5?-toolmarks.jpg  

Advertisement

mla12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2017, 09:48 PM   #2
Remodel and New Build GC
 
MTN REMODEL LLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Colorado @ 7651'
Posts: 5,018
Rewards Points: 2,808
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


My best guess is that there is some frameing issue drying/shifting out... even the best drywaller can not composate.

Maybe, that's why the asked for ten months.

I can guess that they are trying to run away.... hope you have evrything in writing.

I think they are going to have to "relaminate" to use your words... or redrywall with 3/8.

My opinion only...

Advertisement

__________________
Never stop learning (xcep fer speling en typeing)
MTN REMODEL LLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 07:42 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,317
Rewards Points: 1,456
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


Generally, if you have to ask, it is not a level 5. Looking at those pics, I would say not even close. Good luck getting them to even attempt that fix. If you don't mind me asking, how much did you have to pay for that? You might need to go to court. Are you willing to go through that?
mikegp is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 01-11-2017, 07:49 AM   #4
Drywall and Painting Pro
 
Sir MixAlot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Melbourne Beach, Florida
Posts: 824
Rewards Points: 908
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


Quote:
Originally Posted by mla12 View Post
So the drywall company said they were understaffed and only had one relatively inexperienced guy working on the fix, and that we should revisit it in 10 months. In 10 months they'd make us happy.
Theres the problem. You don't get the relatively inexperienced guy to do the skim coating on a ceiling that already has issues.
Just Looks like a terrible skim coat job to me. It might be fixable with some scraping and two more skim coats. Hard to say without being there and putting an eyeball on it. Good luck and keep us posted.
Sir MixAlot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 07:58 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 390
Rewards Points: 776
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


I'm curious, what's level 5? Is there level 1-4 also?
clarenceboddick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 08:14 AM   #6
Drywall and Painting Pro
 
Sir MixAlot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Melbourne Beach, Florida
Posts: 824
Rewards Points: 908
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


Quote:
Originally Posted by clarenceboddick View Post
I'm curious, what's level 5? Is there level 1-4 also?
https://www.usg.com/content/dam/USG_...ems-can-en.pdf

Quote:
Level 0 Used in temporary construction or wherever the final decoration
has not been determined. Unfinished. No taping, finishing or corner
beads are required. Also could be used where non-predecorated
panels will be used in demountable-type partitions which are to be
painted as a final finish.
Level 1 Frequently used in plenum areas above ceilings, in attics, in
areas where the assembly would generally be concealed or in building
service corridors and other areas not normally open to public view.
Some degree of sound and smoke control is provided; in some geographic
areas, this level is referred to as “fire-taping,” although this
level of finish does not typically meet fire-resistant assembly requirements.
Where a fire resistance rating is required for the gypsum board
assembly, details of construction should be in accordance with reports
of fire tests of assemblies that have met the requirements of the fire
rating imposed.
All joints and interior angles shall have tape embedded in joint compound.
Accessories are optional at specifier discretion in corridors and
other areas with pedestrian traffic. Tape and fastener heads need not
be covered with joint compound. Surface shall be free of excess joint
compound. Tool marks and ridges are acceptable.
Level 2 May be used with setting-type compound for areas where
water-resistant gypsum backing board, specification ASTM C630, is
used as a substrate for tile. It may also be specified for standard gypsum
board surfaces in garages, warehouse storage or other similar
areas where surface appearance is not of primary importance.
All joints and interior angles shall have tape embedded in joint compound
and shall be immediately wiped with a joint knife or trowel, leaving
a thin coating of joint compound over all joints and interior angles.
Fastener heads and accessories shall be covered with a coat of joint
compound. Surface shall be free of excess joint compound. Tool marks
and ridges are acceptable.
Level 3 Typically used in areas which are to receive heavy texture
(spray or hand applied) finishes before final painting, or where commercial-grade
(heavy duty) wallcoverings are to be applied as the final
decoration. This level of finish should not be used where smooth painted
surfaces or where lighter weight wallcoverings are specified. The
prepared surface shall be coated with a drywall primer prior to the
application of final finishes.
All joints and interior angles shall have tape embedded in joint compound
and shall be immediately wiped with a joint knife or trowel, leaving
a thin coating of joint compound over all joints and interior angles.
One additional coat of joint compound shall be applied over all joints
and interior angles. Fastener heads and accessories shall be covered
with two separate coats of joint compound. All joint compounds shall
be smooth and free of tool marks and ridges. The prepared surface
5
Finishing Drywall Systems 157
shall be covered with a drywall primer prior to the application of the
final decoration.
Level 4 This level should be used where residential grade (light duty)
wall coverings, flat paints or light textures are to be applied. The prepared
surface shall be coated with a drywall primer prior to the application
of final finishes. Release agents for wall coverings are specifically
formulated to minimize damage if coverings are subsequently
removed. The weight, texture and sheen level of the wallcovering material
selected should be taken into consideration when specifying wallcoverings
over this level of drywall treatment. Joints and fasteners
must be sufficiently concealed if the wallcovering material is lightweight,
contains limited pattern, has a glossy finish or has any combination
of these features. In critical lighting areas, flat paints applied
over light textures tend to reduce joint photographing. Gloss, semigloss
and enamel paints are not recommended over this level of finish.
All joints and interior angles shall have tape embedded in joint compound
and shall be immediately wiped with a joint knife or trowel, leaving
a thin coating of joint compound over all joints and interior angles.
In addition, two separate coats of joint compound shall be applied over
all flat joints and one separate coat of joint compound applied over
interior angles. Fastener heads and accessories shall be covered with
three separate coats of joint compound. All joint compounds shall be
smooth and free of tool marks and ridges. The prepared surface shall
be covered with a drywall primer prior to the application of the final
decoration.
Level 5 The highest quality finish is the most effective method to provide
a uniform surface and minimize the possibility of joint photographing
and of fasteners showing through the final decoration. This
level of finish is required where gloss, semigloss or enamel are specified.
or when flat joints are specified over an untextured surface, or
where critical lighting conditions occur. The prepared surface shall be
coated with a drywall primer prior to the application of final decoration.
All joints and interior angles shall have tape embedded in joint compound
and immediately wiped with a joint knife or trowel, leaving a thin
coating of joint compound over all joints and interior angles. Two separate
coats of joint compound shall be applied over all flat joints and
one separate coat of joint compound applied over interior angles.
Fastener heads and accessories shall be covered with three separate
coats of joint compound. A thin skim coat of joint compound shall be
trowel applied to the entire surface. Excess compound is immediately
sheared off, leaving a film or skim coating of compound completely
covering the paper. As an alternative to a skim coat, a material manufactured
especially for this purpose may be applied. The surface must
be smooth and free of tool marks and ridges. The prepared surface
shall be covered with a drywall primer prior to the application of the
final decoration.
chrisn and firehawkmph like this.
Sir MixAlot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 08:38 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,317
Rewards Points: 1,456
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


It's supposed to be close to perfect. The final coat is sometimes sprayed on thinned out compound on the entire wall and ceiling. The paint even dries uniformly because it all has pretty much the same absorption rate.

Last edited by mikegp; 01-11-2017 at 08:40 AM. Reason: beat me to it
mikegp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 08:39 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 390
Rewards Points: 776
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


Thanks. Is drywall primer required for paint adhesion, or because of the shade difference between the drywall paper and the areas that have skim coats like the screw heads and seams? So the paint won't show the differences of those areas underneath?
clarenceboddick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 08:49 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,317
Rewards Points: 1,456
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


Everything should have the skim coat
mikegp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2017, 05:17 PM   #10
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 7,904
Rewards Points: 392
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


A level 5 surface is very, very rare, At least around here it is.
MTN REMODEL LLC likes this.
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2017, 09:54 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 51
Rewards Points: 102
Default

Re: Is this level 5?


It's technically a L5 finish, but it doesn't matter much if the L1-4 finishes below it are not high quality. As mentioned, that could also be an issue with framing. All the perfect skim coating in the world can't make up for poor quality beneath.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clarenceboddick View Post
Thanks. Is drywall primer required for paint adhesion, or because of the shade difference between the drywall paper and the areas that have skim coats like the screw heads and seams? So the paint won't show the differences of those areas underneath?
Since the entire surface is skim coated, there should be no shade differences. Nor should there be any porosity differences that the paint should reflect. (Of course this does not mean it shouldn't have primer.)

Advertisement

NewHopeHandyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
questions about how level a floor needs to be and what type of flooring to use Jamesmc Flooring 2 12-07-2015 08:11 PM
Toilet Water Level Varies PolishPete Plumbing 6 09-30-2015 02:16 AM
water level equalizing in sump pump basin? dmp Plumbing 21 04-13-2012 06:42 PM
Leveling Kitchen Cabinets for Granite - how level?? vsheetz Kitchen & Bath Remodeling 13 03-02-2012 07:54 PM
Kitchen Cabinet installation, upper cabinets not level BillyJack Kitchen & Bath Remodeling 0 06-30-2010 08:07 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

 

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1