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Old 03-04-2010, 03:14 PM   #1
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How was this texture made?


Hi. I'm new on this site but have looked through it at length. Have also searched the internet. Have found some pics of similar textures but not the same as the one I've attached. Can anyone tell me how they think this particular texture was made? I have almost one entire wall I have to match with it and am having a tough time. Thanks!
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How was this texture made?-100_0457_00.jpg   How was this texture made?-100_0459_00.jpg  

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Old 03-04-2010, 03:24 PM   #2
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How was this texture made?


this is roller texture..

heavy nap roller... watered down compound.

can be hard to duplicate.. you may need to play with various naps on rollers and consitancy of compound.

small area... you could try to dab compound on with a rag.

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Old 03-04-2010, 04:52 PM   #3
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How was this texture made?


Thanks Bob! I have a 3/4" nap and 1 1/4" nap. Hopefully, one of those will come close to matching. I may try the rag as well on some of the smaller areas. I appreciate your help.
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Old 03-05-2010, 07:06 AM   #4
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How was this texture made?


It won't be easy. That is a very, very difficult texture for even the pros to match. We have never applied such a pattern. I don't think we could even duplicate it.

Bottom line = DON'T experiment on your walls and ceilings, do it (practice) on scrap sheetrock.
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:20 AM   #5
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How was this texture made?


I have plenty of scraps and planned on practicing on them this weekend. I knew I'd never be able to match it perfectly, but if I could get close, at least it would blend somewhat. Thanks for your help Atlantic.
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:28 AM   #6
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How was this texture made?


This is why I hate textured walls. Not only do i dislike having to try and match the texture when I need to make a patch, but I also dont care for the look of textured walls to begin with.

I have a ceiling in my family room that has a very similar texture to it and as of now, all Ive done is repaired the hole. Im afraid to even try to match the texture. Its only 2' by 2' but large enough to notice any imperfections. Ill probably just dab it on with a rag like another person suggested. Cant hire someone for a job that small
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Old 03-05-2010, 11:35 AM   #7
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How was this texture made?


Unfortunately, the texture on my walls was put on many yrs ago before I lived there. I'm pretty much stuck with it unless I want to sand it all down or replace the drywall. Neither sound fun to me.
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Old 03-05-2010, 12:03 PM   #8
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How was this texture made?


I had to do some patching of similar texture in the homes I was a superintendent on. What I found was the best result was to loosely wad up a plastic bag and dip it into some thinner joint compound. Not too thin. Then it was as simple as getting the right amount of pressure with each push on the drywall.

Another way we did it was to use a thick brush (the one I used was a circle brush with a broom threaded attachment about 4" in diameter) that was wetted and then smashed with something heavy to spread apart the bristles so they would stay, then it was the same technique as the plastic bag.

We called it a stomped texture, we used it in our ceilings of our houses, as it would hide smaller hairline cracks and shadows well over time.
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Old 03-05-2010, 06:06 PM   #9
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How was this texture made?


The origin of the roller texture is most likely lost to construction history.
I assume some workman forgot their stipple brush oneday ( the round stomper described in above post).

The technique is to roll on the compound in two directions at 90* / overlaping each 4x4 or so area worked at a time. Being consitant in direction is all important.

The guy paying the bill benefits by having their problem covered uniformly, quickly, and at relative very low cost.

Many yukie large plaster and later drywall patches have been dealt with by roller texture.

Worn out not fit to paint with rollers are used. (they are trash after a roller texture project). Hence the difficulty in trying to duplicate the
the texture is multiplied.

Like horseshoes... get close and you are a winner.

Gracie, prime and give the new wall a couple of paint coats... it will help
the new wall blend with the others.

Good luck and have fun... always get someone to help you... when something goes wrong... you can blame it on them.
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:42 PM   #10
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How was this texture made?


Thanks again Bob for your words of wisdom and your humor. Hopefully, I can make something work and look halfway decent. At least I have a direction to move in now.
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Old 03-06-2010, 01:19 AM   #11
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How was this texture made?


I made a similiar repair/ pattern with a tiling sponge and juicy mud for a smaller area. i always experiment on scrap. also the compound shrinks some as the water evaporates.
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Old 03-06-2010, 07:59 AM   #12
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How was this texture made?


I'd have to agree that it looks like it's just thinned mud rolled on with a long nap roller like a stipple without using the brush. The consistency of the mud will have a lot to do with how the mud rolls out and the end product. I use a 3/4" nap to roll for stipple and adjust the consistency of the mud to get heavier or lighter pattern. Of course a longer nap would change things too, but is also heavier to work with on a big job since it holds more mud. As I get older, the heavier roller isn't something I look forward to using for a long period of time....

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