DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Drywall & Plaster (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/)
-   -   How to seal off opening in 3 layers of 1/2" drywall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/how-seal-off-opening-3-layers-1-2-drywall-131059/)

djgrant 01-23-2012 12:57 AM

How to seal off opening in 3 layers of 1/2" drywall
 
1 Attachment(s)
There is 3 layers of drywall on one of our ceiling areas and there is an opening for a heating register. How can I seal off that drywall so that there is no chance of loose drywall or dust falling down. The area right beneath there is where kids play and there is the heating air that will blow past it. Will spackle stick to the drywall there? Thanks.

joecaption 01-23-2012 01:05 AM

And what happened to the boot where the vent was?
Why not just put back where it belongs.

djgrant 01-23-2012 05:03 AM

What are you talking about?

beenthere 01-23-2012 05:32 AM

The supply appears to still be above that hole, and not sealed.

DangerMouse 01-23-2012 07:11 AM

I would be far more concerned about THREE layers of drywall falling on the kids than a little dust! I would take the drywall down, ALL OF IT, and put in ONE layer of 5/8" Fire-X. Then replace the register. Leave it closed if you do not need the heat there at that point in time, but leave it there. It was likely designed that way on purpose.

DM

Maintenance 6 01-23-2012 07:54 AM

You don't need drywall work. You need sheet metal. Looks to me like somebody just rough cut a hole in the duct to supply conditioned air to the room and never finished. I'd line the hole with sheet metal up to the duct, secure it and put a proper diffuser in place. I have to guess that there may be a fire code requirement for 3 layers of drywall. If it's all secure, I would leave it.

mikegp 01-23-2012 08:04 AM

What are the chances of all three layers being properly secured? That would require some long screws. Is it possible they just screwed the bottom layer to the next? Glue maybe? Seems odd.

AtlanticWBConst. 01-23-2012 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 (Post 831894)
You don't need drywall work. You need sheet metal. Looks to me like somebody just rough cut a hole in the duct to supply conditioned air to the room and never finished. I'd line the hole with sheet metal up to the duct, secure it and put a proper diffuser in place. I have to guess that there may be a fire code requirement for 3 layers of drywall. If it's all secure, I would leave it.

^^ This would be my thought on it as well ^^

Aside from the sheet metal related work, I'd also suggest to leave the drywall where it is. One possible scenerio:

Layer # 1: Looks like older plaster board (original ceiling).

Layer # 2: Could be a lay-over repair of the old ceiling.

Layer # 3: Could be an addition of Fire-rated sheetrock to accommodate current code requirements.

AtlanticWBConst. 01-23-2012 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikegp (Post 831899)
What are the chances of all three layers being properly secured? That would require some long screws. Is it possible they just screwed the bottom layer to the next? Glue maybe? Seems odd.

Yes, they likely would have used longer screws + potentially glue - if it was professionally installed.

Example: If all 3 layers are 5/8" = 1-7/8" + 3/4" = So 2-1/2" screws would work/hold.

(When we had a dedicated drywall work-van, we always kept all kinds of lengths & types of drywall screws from 1" to 4" to accommodate any remodeling project).


FWIW: The average weight of 1/2" GWB in interior residential construction generally weighs about 1.6 pounds per square foot, so you are looking at about 5 pounds SF or less for the ceiling weight.

joecaption 01-23-2012 09:27 AM

You missing your ceiling register box and defuser.
http://www.indoorcomfortsupply.com/c...&category=MRBX

DangerMouse 01-23-2012 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 831934)
Layer # 1: Looks like older plaster board (original ceiling).

Layer # 2: Could be a lay-over repair of the old ceiling.

Layer # 3: Could be an addition of Fire-rated sheetrock to accommodate current code requirements.

If so, that sure is an awful lot of sheetrock to hang on a ceiling to meet fire requirements! :eek: scary stuff....

DM

AtlanticWBConst. 01-23-2012 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DangerMouse (Post 832030)
If so, that sure is an awful lot of sheetrock to hang on a ceiling to meet fire requirements! :eek: scary stuff....

DM

Not that scary.

I'd reckon to say that Horsehair plaster & wood lathing weighs more per SF than 3 layers of conventional 1/2" GWB per SF.

I could be wrong, but that stuff is dang heavy, if not heavier.

djgrant 01-23-2012 01:52 PM

The extra layers of drywall were simply added to make the ceiling flush with another spot that was 1 inches lower.

"Maintenance 6" is correct, someone rough cut a hole in the duct and put a hole in the drywall but didn't put any other sheet metal like they probably should have. During our renovations, the 2 extra layers or drywall were added.

I don't think I have the skills necessary to do the sheet metal work. Is it really important to do the sheet metal? It seems to provide lots of air as is. Is there any other concern?

joecaption 01-23-2012 01:59 PM

There is no skill involved in this one, if you can turn a screw driver and close up a wire tie you can do it.
All your going to need is the size of the hole to go buy the ceiling adapter.

djgrant 01-23-2012 02:08 PM

So it sounds like you're saying I just get an adapter and the adapter is screwed to the duct?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:16 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved