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-   -   How on earth do you drywall this? (photos) (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/how-earth-do-you-drywall-photos-113556/)

JustADoc 08-10-2011 12:03 AM

How on earth do you drywall this? (photos)
 
This wall is going to be a royal pain to drywall. The room I'm standing in for the picture has a concrete subfloor and is a den that you step down into. The rest of the house sits on floor joists.

However, when they built the partition wall for one of the adjacent rooms, it doesn't sit flush with the edge of the joist. Hence, you get the overhang seen in the photo below. The worst part is even that isn't square - on the side you see in this photo there's about an inch of overhang but on the opposite side of the wall about 8' back there's only about 1/2" overhang.

So, what do you do short of tearing out the entire wall and rebuilding it flush? Is there an easier solution?

http://www.eruptmedia.net/drywall.jpg

oh'mike 08-10-2011 05:18 AM

One more picture would help--just an over all that shows the wall straight on.

You know that flattening out the framing is the best bet---and might not take all that long to do.

But to get the quickest method we need and overall shot.---Mike--

AGWhitehouse 08-10-2011 09:06 AM

1/2"-3/4" plywood or furring strips at the rim joist. double 1/2" at the 1" overhang and taper down at each stud as you go.

Or, if you're confident with a saw, you could rip a length of board with the taper and attach to the rim joist.

I did notice the flared out gwb on the opposite side of the wall. If you don't mind the warped finish wall in that room, you could add a layer of sheetrock on the rim joist only and then sheath the wall fully. You'll have a 1/2" warp at one end and it will be flush at the other.

tpolk 08-10-2011 09:12 AM

if no wiring etc in way set string lines and sister studs to sides

JustADoc 08-10-2011 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse (Post 704181)
1/2"-3/4" plywood or furring strips at the rim joist. double 1/2" at the 1" overhang and taper down at each stud as you go.

Or, if you're confident with a saw, you could rip a length of board with the taper and attach to the rim joist.

I did notice the flared out gwb on the opposite side of the wall. If you don't mind the warped finish wall in that room, you could add a layer of sheetrock on the rim joist only and then sheath the wall fully. You'll have a 1/2" warp at one end and it will be flush at the other.

All the GWB is gone - you're probably seeing the plastic sheeting covering the doorway - which is where another picture would have helped tremendously. I'll shoot one in a second.

That's basically what the previous builder did 30 years ago. They used some kind of cheap 1/2" OSB to build the entire wall out. Of course, for as long as I can remember (20+ years) the bottom of that wall was caved in. Furniture, etc. hadn't split the drywall but had certainly pushed it in.

Another picture coming in a moment.

AGWhitehouse 08-10-2011 12:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustADoc (Post 704267)
All the GWB is gone - you're probably seeing the plastic sheeting covering the doorway

I was looking at the top right of the picture at the surface through the wall on the back side of the stud you have dimensioned with the 1".

JustADoc 08-10-2011 04:48 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse

I was looking at the top right of the picture at the surface through the wall on the back side of the stud you have dimensioned with the 1".

Okay I misunderstood, I see what you mean now. I'm attaching a photo of the entire wall. Only the bottom plate between the openings (doorway and serve-through) hangs over.

Rebuilding the wall would be a mess as we just renovated the room on the other side. Sounds like the best bet is to try and plane out some filler boards to bring the edge as even as possible.

user123303 08-10-2011 05:33 PM

have you still got the paint color for the adjacent room? you may want to "bite it on this one" it will take just as much if not more time to fart around as it will to start again.( making sure crowns are proper,floor to ceiling,sills,16" centers,etc...) install a nice straight wall and you will finish a nice straight wall. done right! but weigh out your variables is this a focal point of any kind? imperfections will jump out. if its behind the freezer in the basement... a bandaid will do

epson 08-10-2011 06:47 PM

You can use drywall shims construction crews use them too quickly and inexpensively correct minor framing flaws such as bowed or twisted studs, out of plumb corners, and misaligned window and door frames. They are also used to fur out the two studs adjacent to the vertical joint where two sheets of drywall meet, creating a slight cavity at the joint. This allows the tape and mud to lay perfectly flat, eliminating wavy walls, and reducing finishing labor.

JustADoc 08-10-2011 09:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by epson
You can use drywall shims construction crews use them too quickly and inexpensively correct minor framing flaws such as bowed or twisted studs, out of plumb corners, and misaligned window and door frames. They are also used to fur out the two studs adjacent to the vertical joint where two sheets of drywall meet, creating a slight cavity at the joint. This allows the tape and mud to lay perfectly flat, eliminating wavy walls, and reducing finishing labor.

Interesting idea, that may very well be the answer I needed. Perhaps if we can adequately build out each stud with drywall shims it will give us the additional depth we need.

AllanJ 08-11-2011 01:48 PM

If the studs themselves are not bowed then full height uniformly thick strips of wood (furring strips, filler boards) as opposed to short shims can be put on the studs and then the drywall put on. Each stud can have a furring strip of a different thickness so once you get some distance from the protruding studs, no more furring strips are needed.

You can use short (2 to 3 inch) vertical furring strips of varying thickness as nailers on the rim joist down below, about 8 inches apart, if you are unable to shape a horizontal furring strip with varying thickness to match the wall contour (if not perfectly flat) created or implied by the furring strips on the studs.

epson 08-11-2011 05:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustADoc (Post 704708)
Interesting idea, that may very well be the answer I needed. Perhaps if we can adequately build out each stud with drywall shims it will give us the additional depth we need.

Yeah they are very inexpensive and you can use them for a lot of different applications. You can find them at your local drywall supplier or even some big box stores carry them.

maxsmoothwall 08-13-2011 05:25 AM

Looks like a chizlit situation
 
Have seen this type of condition many times. One wayward stud for whatever reason. Get or get out your 1 1/2" wood chiesel, make it real sharp, strike lines on both sides of the stud which will be flush and chizlit. Only takes a few minutes and its a lot of fun. Make sure the stud is secure to the plate or if loose it could damage the other side.

Max


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