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-   -   How do you tape/mud the ends of drywall sheets that arent recessed/dimpled? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/how-do-you-tape-mud-ends-drywall-sheets-arent-recessed-dimpled-45197/)

dsq 05-25-2009 04:03 AM

How do you tape/mud the ends of drywall sheets that arent recessed/dimpled?
 
How do you tape/mud the ends of drywall sheets (when joining together for a high wall) that dont have the recess/groove that the length part has?thanks

Just Bill 05-25-2009 06:15 AM

You tape them as you would any other joint, but you taper the compound over a longer path12+" on either side of the joint. There will be a bump, but done right, it is barely noticeable.

dsq 05-25-2009 11:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Bill (Post 278147)
You tape them as you would any other joint, but you taper the compound over a longer path12+" on either side of the joint. There will be a bump, but done right, it is barely noticeable.

Should i mud and tape the dimpled edges before the non-dimpled edges(the non dimpled edges meet the dimpled edges in some places)?Or should i mud/tape and let dry the dimpled edges first and then do the non dimpled edges?I have next to zero exp doing mud/tape.

2)Is there any wallboard that has all four edges dimpled?

Just Bill 05-26-2009 06:03 AM

Just for terminoloy sake, the nails/screws are dimpled, the edges are tapered. You do the first and subsequent coats on all joints at the same time. The butt edges may require and extra coat to feather out the joint.

I am not aware if any that have 4 tapered sides.

Termite 05-26-2009 09:30 AM

This is why they make slightly curved trowels (not knives, trowels)...Taping butt seams. They're about 14" wide. They build a hump of mud over the joint that can be feathered out with 12" wide taping knives after the hump dries.

dsq 05-26-2009 12:47 PM

What size trowel do i need for doing seams?
What type/grade/number of sandpaper do i need for sanding?

Thanks.

Termite 05-26-2009 01:44 PM

At the very least you need a humped trowel, a 12" taping knife and a 6" taping knife. A 4" knife is nice for spotting screw holes.

Get drywall sanding mesh, not sandpaper.

dsq 06-01-2009 02:22 PM

Is paper or mesh tape better for non tapered butt seams?

For the first coat which will be over the tape do i just put down enough for the tape or do i make a wide coat?What is the progression for building up a wide feathered coat?

Also if i can t get a bowed trowel will i be able to do the butt seams?
I bought a 14inch trowel but no bow.Should i replace it with a 12in taping knife?

Thanks.

Maintenance 6 06-02-2009 06:54 AM

The trowel Termite is talking about looks like a 4"x12" concrete finishing trowel, but if you sight along the long side of the blade, it will have a very slight concave in it. They are available in most places that sell drywall supplies. Mud your tape onto the butt joint and then put a layer of mud over the tape with this trowel. After it dries build a layer of mud on either side of the joint with a wide taping knife to taper the surface.

dsq 06-02-2009 03:19 PM

the bowed trowels were 25$+...that is why i want to know if i can do this with just a tape knife or regular trowel...also if i use mesh tape ,i do not put mud on first then tape, right?Also for that first coat with tape i do not put on a thick coat over the tape,correct?

bjbatlanta 06-02-2009 09:43 PM

People do things differently in different parts of the country and by the way they are taught. I use a 10" drywall knife and "double" the butt (non tapered) joints on the first coat. I pull the middle with a 12" knife for the skim coat. I've never owned a trowel, but that is not to say they don't have their merits or uses. IF you use mesh tape, you need setting type compound for the first coat. Either type of tape, the thinner the coat of mud, the better. You'll end up with a "rounded" joint if you try to build it up too much and it will be noticeable, especially in strong lighting situations. If you use paper tape, you may be able to see the tape somewhat when you first apply a coat of mud. The mud is sort of semi-transparent when wet. As it dries, it becomes whiter and "hides" the tape more. Several thin coats will be better than trying to build up and cover in one coat.....

dsq 06-03-2009 04:51 PM

i laid down a thin coat over the tape maybe 6in wide...how should i sand it?A lot or just so its smooth?
Should i now do 1 or 2 more mud coats?
How wide should the layer of mud be and what technique to get it on as smooth and tapered as possible?
ALso is it better for first timer to use knife or trowel?

thanks

bjbatlanta 06-03-2009 05:38 PM

What kind of tape did you end up using?? If it's paper, you shouldn't need to sand at all. If mesh, just lightly brush to smooth out. Again, I pull a thin layer with a 10" knife on either side of the tape just slightly overlapping in the middle. There will be a slight mark from the overlap. Lightly sand that before pulling the middle of the joint with a 12" (10" will work if you don't have a 12" and don't need to buy one), again a thin coat. Lightly sand the whole joint once dry. All you're really trying to achieve is to cover the EDGES of the tape slightly and leave as little mud in the middle as possible. Even if you can still see a bit of tape showing, it will paint. Don't sand too hard and "burr or fuzz" the tape though. And again, if you're a first timer, either method is what you will go forth with and this IS the learning curve. Choose your weapon as the one that has the most comfortable feel to you. I'd say knife and pan, but I know there are those who advocate the hawk and trowel. I've never used them (on drywall anyway...).

dsq 06-04-2009 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bjbatlanta (Post 282352)
What kind of tape did you end up using?? If it's paper, you shouldn't need to sand at all. If mesh, just lightly brush to smooth out. ... Choose your weapon as the one that has the most comfortable feel to you. I'd say knife and pan, but I know there are those who advocate the hawk and trowel. I've never used them (on drywall anyway...).

Well all i had was the 14in trowel and a 6in knife...The trowel felt very awkward immediately so i tried the 6in knife.It felt very natural.However i am sure its gonna look like an abortion and there wil be plaenty of sanding.Anyway i think i will go out nd buy a 10 or 12 in knife to do a third coat.

bjbatlanta 06-04-2009 05:33 PM

Good call. They're not that expensive and in my opinion easier to use than a trowel.


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