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Old 12-16-2009, 11:31 AM   #1
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


We replaced the entry door, and now a sub-contractor is finishing the drywall. He left the house to go get the mud, so I decided to check everything out before he came back.Today he is going to take down the drywall around the door and replace it with 1/4" drywall.
I've posted pictures on Flickr.Tell me am I crazy to stop this job or am I doing what is right?
This isn't spam...I need your opinion!! HELP!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/44161954@N06/
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?-dscf1387.jpg   HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?-dscf1385.jpg  


Last edited by MayJune; 12-16-2009 at 11:46 AM. Reason: Added pictures
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Old 12-16-2009, 11:42 AM   #2
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


The way it was hung in the pictures is prone to many issues:

1) Nail popping. Use drywall screws. Also create much less of a dent to fill when using screws.

2) Butt joints especially around doors(even worse around exterior doors) will always crack. Always try to avoid or adleast minimize joints at or around doors whenever possible. You've got too many small pieces shoved together, some not even nailed.

3) The bottom corner where the paper is torn will always be a weak spot unless you seal it with primer and build it back up. It's more work to fix that than it would be to replace it.

4) The 1/2" drywall that meets the door jamb it sticking out way too much. When it comes to baseboard time you'll never get them to sit flush. If 1/4" was suggested and alleviates the issue, go with that.

5) I don't know whats going on with your ceiling picture. There is exposed OSB sheathing. It just doesn't look right.

While its true mudding and taping can hide most flaws that assumes that you took the proper precautions to avoid common mistakes.

Honestly, tear it down. Sorry.

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Old 12-16-2009, 12:09 PM   #3
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Disregard the previous post with regard to drywall thickness and use of nails.

1/2" drywall is code. If the gap is large enough the casing can not accommodate the drywall then it will be necessary to install a jamb extension. Nailing is fine if done correctly which it has not been. There should be a continuous board installed across the top. No nails or screws in the header. If nails are used double nailing is required (nail spaced 2" from each other). Exp: Nail 2" nail 12" nail 2" nail.

A small gap in the corners is OK. The tear out needs to be replaced. I'm not sure what is going on with the ceiling but if that is a space or if someone is planning on taping and muding OSB it's not going to work. The pieced in squares are unprofessional and likely to crack. Roofing nails are no good for drywall work.

Last edited by ARI001; 12-16-2009 at 12:35 PM.
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Old 12-16-2009, 12:28 PM   #4
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Disregard my post? The 1/2" and 1/4" use can be debated depending on locality. Some places even require fireproof drywall on all exterior walls. Personally I would fix the door alignment and go with 1/2".

All my points are valid so I'm unsure of why my post should be disregarded.

Last edited by n0c7; 12-16-2009 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 12-16-2009, 12:33 PM   #5
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Quote:
Originally Posted by n0c7 View Post
Disregard my post?
The part about 1/4" drywall and not using nails. Nails can be used effectively to hang drywall as long as they are installed properly. 1/2" drywall is code.
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Old 12-16-2009, 12:33 PM   #6
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


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1/2" drywall is code.
I didn't see where the OP stated a location. How can you know what their code is?

Drywall is cheap -- don't patch together little pieces.

Making jamb extentions is tedious, especially if they have to taper, but they're not difficult.

You could cover the OSB strip with crown, but why isn't there drywall?
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Old 12-16-2009, 12:38 PM   #7
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Quote:
Originally Posted by ARI001 View Post
The part about 1/4" drywall and not using nails. Nails can be used effectively to hang drywall as long as they are installed properly. 1/2" drywall is code.
I won't comment on the 1/4" and 1/2" issue as it will become a lengthy debate.

As for nails, three reasons to avoid them:

1) They are known to pop more than screws.
2) They make a larger dent in the drywall to fill, more prone to cracking.
3) For an amateur, he cannot easily take down his work for corrections in the hanging stage.
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Old 12-16-2009, 12:51 PM   #8
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Looks like the door assembly sets closer to the side wall on the right, than on the left too. You'll see that forever, even if the drywall gets resolved.
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Old 12-16-2009, 12:54 PM   #9
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


The is a prefabricated home.
When the house was built by the previous owners they neglected to pour a bump out in the basement foundation for the front door.The small plywood area that is necessary for the crane to lift the house onto the foundation was left intact for the last five years.The plywood was breaking down which allowed water in the basement.
The OSB was once on the exterior of my house. They brought the door frame out about 18" so it is flush with the front of the house.

Last edited by MayJune; 12-16-2009 at 12:59 PM.
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Old 12-16-2009, 12:58 PM   #10
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Quote:
Originally Posted by n0c7 View Post
I won't comment on the 1/4" and 1/2" issue as it will become a lengthy debate.

As for nails, three reasons to avoid them:

1) They are known to pop more than screws.
2) They make a larger dent in the drywall to fill, more prone to cracking.
3) For an amateur, he cannot easily take down his work for corrections in the hanging stage.
1) Either can pop as you have acknowledged. Popping has more to do with movement and or shrinkage then it does with fastener type.
2) When installed properly by a skilled installer there should only be a slight indentation from driving the nail.
3) I don't hang rock with the idea of having to take it down. That is a ludicrous argument. That makes as much sense as the argument of using less fasteners in case someone wants to remodel down the road.
4) The OP has hired someone to do the install. They should be familiar with the standards and proper techniques (though not the case here) to install the drywall properly using either method. Both methods are acceptable.

That said I prefer to use screws and glue. You still need to know where to place them and how far to space them as well as where not to place them.
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Old 12-16-2009, 01:03 PM   #11
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 View Post
Looks like the door assembly sets closer to the side wall on the right, than on the left too. You'll see that forever, even if the drywall gets resolved.
Mine does that. I put a 3/8" jamb extention on the left, and a 1/2" extention on the right, with a tapered strip across the top. You can see it if you look at it, but it doesnt' jump out at you. The trick is getting a good joint between the extention strips and the original jamb.

I had considered tearing out my door and building a new jamb to fit, but it would have been a lot of work. I'm glad I took the approach that I took.
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Old 12-16-2009, 01:11 PM   #12
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 View Post
Looks like the door assembly sets closer to the side wall on the right, than on the left too. You'll see that forever, even if the drywall gets resolved.
It's OK there will be a built in on that wall.
Not built by the drywall guy or any of his friends.
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Old 12-16-2009, 01:27 PM   #13
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Quote:
Originally Posted by pyper View Post
I didn't see where the OP stated a location. How can you know what their code is?

Drywall is cheap -- don't patch together little pieces.

Making jamb extentions is tedious, especially if they have to taper, but they're not difficult.

You could cover the OSB strip with crown, but why isn't there drywall?
I know 3/8" is the absolute minimum thickness depending on application and finish allowed by IRC code which has been adopted by all 50 states. I will acknowledge that it may come down to locality from there.

The OP stated later that this is a manufactured home which are generally built to conform to the strictest codes.
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Old 12-16-2009, 02:10 PM   #14
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


Quote:
Originally Posted by ARI001 View Post
The OP stated later that this is a manufactured home which are generally built to conform to the strictest codes.
If it's indeed a manufactured home, then it falls under HUD code, not building codes. The last time I looked, which was at least 10 years ago, HUD code didn't require sheetrock at all (you could put plywood paneling on the studs), but moving the entry door would definitely be a violation -- you can't do anything that might change the building's performance in the wind without an engineer's seal.

But if it's a modular home (not manufactured) it *would* fall under local building codes.
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Old 12-16-2009, 03:20 PM   #15
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HELP!!Is this the way drywall is hung?


It is a Module home not manufactured.

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