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Old 04-13-2011, 09:43 AM   #1
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Hanging Drywall


I'm going to be hanging drywall and my ceilings are all slanted with the angle of the roof. I wanted to ask about hanging the sheets. I haven't hung drywall before, I have only mud/putty, cut, sand or painted it. I assume I should cut triangular pieces and hang those flush with the ceiling first right? Following that I should hang the sheets below which would all be square/rectangular?

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Old 04-13-2011, 11:59 AM   #2
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First thing you should do is what the pros do almost instinctively and layout your pattern for the room---sheets horizontal, vertical, etc---than worry about cutting the weird little pieces last. If you start at the ceiling like that you are probably not going to end up square for long and you will end up cutting worse shaped small pieces along the floor or walls that will waste a lot of material and require much more taping and so forth. I subcontracted drywall out to the wizards but you can do it. You might want to snap some chalk lines if this is your first time out. And do invest in a good drywall square!

If you think about it, drywall is a lot like laying tile. You cannot just start at one side or corner and expect things to work out when you get to the other one. Have fun! Be careful. Newbies often underestimate the weight of the stuff.


Last edited by user1007; 04-13-2011 at 12:06 PM.
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Old 04-13-2011, 12:02 PM   #3
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Thanks for the advice. I thought generally people started at the ceiling so that there weren't gaps and it's easier to manage. Good thing I asked!
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Old 04-13-2011, 12:22 PM   #4
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Sorry, did not mean to mislead you. Usually the upper sheets go on first but that is mainly so you don't damage installed sheets underneath. As long as you can stay square or true to your grid you can and should start with those triangles I guess. Just make sure you have a layout to follow as you go. Whatever you are off in say an upper right corner is just going to multiply on you as you head for the lower left one.

Just encouraging you to scale things out and make a little map.

Last edited by user1007; 04-13-2011 at 12:24 PM.
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Old 04-13-2011, 12:42 PM   #5
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Thanks for the clarification. I was honestly wondering if I was going to hear something odd like laying the entire sheet of drywall at the angle and having very odd shaped lower pieces.
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Old 04-13-2011, 12:58 PM   #6
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Stack from the bottom when hanging a vaulted wall...
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Old 04-13-2011, 02:20 PM   #7
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It isn't a slanted wall like an A frame, just a wall where the top follows the roof's angle.

I'm not sure if a "vaulted wall" is what I have or a wall that is leaning like an A frame.
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Old 04-28-2011, 02:04 AM   #8
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One thing to do- start at the taller end of the wall (high point of roof)-measure down 4' from the ceiling. Mark this level line on your studs (this is before you cut even 1 sheet of drywall)

Mark this line across the wall, you can now take accurate measurements for your sheets (i'm assuming you are hanging horizontal here, better practice IMO)
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Old 04-28-2011, 08:15 AM   #9
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Thanks
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Old 05-01-2011, 03:21 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x106 View Post
I'm going to be hanging drywall and my ceilings are all slanted with the angle of the roof. I wanted to ask about hanging the sheets. I haven't hung drywall before, I have only mud/putty, cut, sand or painted it. I assume I should cut triangular pieces and hang those flush with the ceiling first right? Following that I should hang the sheets below which would all be square/rectangular?

I'm not really sure what you are asking. Always start with the "lids" (the ceiling), then the walls. Yes, work from the top down, well... really it probably won't matter how you do it. Usually it's easier to hang the big sheets first and then piece in.

What you need to do is figure out what will give you the least amount of joint, and what will give you joints in the easiest places to fill. That's how we do professionally. This never results in standing up the sheets, or laying them diagonally, always horizontal if there is to be joints.

Anyways, perhaps others are giving you clearer advice than I am.
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:04 PM   #11
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Thanks for all of your advice so far. I had a mishap two weeks ago and lost maybe 1/4 inch or so from two fingers so my projects were delayed a bit.

A friend came over to and we installed a few windows over the last few days and hung our first bit of drywall today. So far so good with one exception - Since I'm in a modular manufactured home the interior walls don't always intersect where there is a stud. There will be a stud on just the interior wall. It looks like we will hang the drywall on the walls that don't have a stud at the corner first then use the drywall from the intersecting wall to hold the corner snug. I'm not sure if I'm saying this very clearly but I assume this is the only/best option.

This issue also causes the 8x4 sheets of drywall not to end on a stud each time (only once so far but I see more down the road). We were thinking of just cutting the sheet down so it would end on a stud which will make it easier for the following sheets. But, maybe there is a different way...

So far though we have had no issues cutting the angle in the drywall and hanging them starting from the ceiling and working down.
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:24 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x106 View Post
Since I'm in a modular manufactured home the interior walls don't always intersect where there is a stud. There will be a stud on just the interior wall. It looks like we will hang the drywall on the walls that don't have a stud at the corner first then use the drywall from the intersecting wall to hold the corner snug.
You are best to get a piece of steel angle and screw it to the corner first, it will give you the necessary backing. Or you could always screw/nail 2x4's in for backing where you are missing the stud. You're idea is good in nature, but you don't want that sheet on the exterior wall to move.

Quote:
This issue also causes the 8x4 sheets of drywall not to end on a stud each time (only once so far but I see more down the road). We were thinking of just cutting the sheet down so it would end on a stud which will make it easier for the following sheets.
Yes, definitely cut the sheet so it lands half way on a stud. Remember you always want the factory edges to butt up together when possible, cut the side of the sheet that lands in the corner. Factory edges to factory edges, bevels to bevels, butts to butts.

Dan
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:32 PM   #13
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Very useful information!

I had cut one square to see insulation and judge if I planned to add more but the house was very well insulated so I wasn't going to change that. The drywall is glued to all of the studs except for the seams which were nailed then covered with wood trim. I'm assuming you would suggest I remove drywall at least in these corners to put a "stud extension" in?

Knowing the insulation was decent I didn't want to remove the glued sheets. I figured the extra drywall will help insulation a bit too anyway.
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:35 PM   #14
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As long as the sheets are not loose, I wouldn't remove them. Also, if you are glueing sheets (this is better) you need to at least put one screw in the middle of the sheet on every other stud, this is to ensure the sheet is tacked tight to the studs while the glue sets.

Dan
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:39 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by dberladyn View Post
As long as the sheets are not loose, I wouldn't remove them. Also, if you are glueing sheets (this is better) you need to at least put one screw in the middle of the sheet on every other stud, this is to ensure the sheet is tacked tight to the studs while the glue sets.

Dan
I would have never thought gluing would be better but it certainly sounds like it could save time. I could see how it might make my job easier.

Thanks for all the help!

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