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-   -   hanging ceiling drywall in a basement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/hanging-ceiling-drywall-basement-98037/)

charlie bob 03-11-2011 11:55 AM

hanging ceiling drywall in a basement
 
the rear of my basement is a finished stud wall that is insulated and drywalled. i am now ready to put up the ceiling drywall in spaces adjoining the rear wall. i am aware that ceiling drywall should go up first, but as the drywall is already installed on one end of the walls and is taped, can i install the ceiling drywall without it having the support provided by the existing wall drywall? three of the four sides in each of the 3 rooms will be drywalled after the ceiling drywall is in place. will this be enough support?
thank you

canadaclub 03-11-2011 12:07 PM

Yes, you will be just fine. The wall drywall offers very little support for ceiling drywall. Usually ceiling drywall goes up first to get a nice, straight and tight seal.

i_need_help 03-11-2011 02:21 PM

Also think about all those sheets out in the middle of the room they hold up just fine without any edge support from the drywall on the walls.

bernieb 03-11-2011 05:04 PM

Use some construction glue to help hold it up.

Gary in WA 03-11-2011 09:49 PM

The manufacturers require the ceiling installed first for a good reason.

In a truss situation, the seasonal changes move the truss up or down, so not nailing the ceiling wall edges but letting the wall drywall support the lid will let the board move with the truss; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...d-but-strange/
In a floor joist above, the activity above moves the joist which is transmitted to the wall connection and intersection, causing possible fastener pops or tape joint cracks there. A floating corner at wall/ceiling reduces this; Figs. 3,4,5 on pp.9; And (4.9.1) http://gypsum.org/pdf/GA-216-2010.html
Which is why it’s in the instructions for the warranty; pp. 9- (4.6.1)
You will be alright, but lose the warranty and possibly some fastener pops, but you know how to fix them!
Keep in mind that wood shrinks more across its width, so don’t fasten drywall in the header; http://www.paintsource.net/pages/sol...ood_shrink.htm

Gary

Dave88LX 06-21-2013 11:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gary in WA (Post 607639)
The manufacturers require the ceiling installed first for a good reason.

In a truss situation, the seasonal changes move the truss up or down, so not nailing the ceiling wall edges but letting the wall drywall support the lid will let the board move with the truss; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...d-but-strange/
In a floor joist above, the activity above moves the joist which is transmitted to the wall connection and intersection, causing possible fastener pops or tape joint cracks there. A floating corner at wall/ceiling reduces this; Figs. 3,4,5 on pp.9; And (4.9.1) http://gypsum.org/pdf/GA-216-2010.html
Which is why itís in the instructions for the warranty; pp. 9- (4.6.1)
You will be alright, but lose the warranty and possibly some fastener pops, but you know how to fix them!
Keep in mind that wood shrinks more across its width, so donít fasten drywall in the header; http://www.paintsource.net/pages/sol...ood_shrink.htm

Gary

Great info, glad I found this thread.

Not sure I understand ALL the terminology in the articles, but, I get the overall message.


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