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Old 03-18-2013, 11:49 AM   #16
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The 1-5/8" screws on the wall would only be an issue if there are pipes/wires close enough to hit with a screw. They should have FHA straps over them, if that is the case, to prevent hitting them. The 1-1/4" screws are also easier to run (won't "wobble" as much trying to start them). 8" spacing is sufficient and using a "dimpler" will work for a small area, but screw guns aren't terribly expensive and would probably be faster....

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Old 03-18-2013, 06:58 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by CharlieR View Post
Wish I would have read your reply a bit earlier! I ended up going and getting some 5/8" sheets. Guess it doesn't hurt, will just be more of a workout! :O)

so here are some other novice questions... looking for the answer in the forum, but getting sidetracked reading too many posts and haven't found it yet!

1 1/4" screws on 1/2" sheets on the walls? 1 5/8" screws on the ceiling (5/8") drywall? Is there a danger of using the 1 5/8" on the walls?

Is the norm to put screws in every 6" or so? (on every joist/stud).

Lastly, is a dimpler bit for my drill/driver sufficient? Or should I invest in an actual drywall gun? The room isn't that big, and I will likely be doing some other work in the future, so don't mind getting tools. However, at this point in time, if I can get by with the dimpler (or some other bit attachment), I'd probably go that way.

Thanks,
Charlie
Yes you can use 1 5/8" screws for both.
Yes every 6 or 8 inches will be fine.
Dimpler will work just fine.
Good luck let us know how it comes out.
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Old 03-24-2013, 10:38 AM   #18
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Do you guys use glue on the ceiling to help hold it? Like pre glue the joists before you push the board up? Then screw it?
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Old 03-24-2013, 03:47 PM   #19
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it won't hurt to use glue. The one I like the best is OSI F-38 here is a link. Maybe they have it in Canada?
http://www.osipro.com/products.pl?id=GS%20DRYWALL
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Old 03-25-2013, 08:48 AM   #20
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Thanks nailbags. Probably no point on the ceiling though, since it's the top floor, and has a vapour barrier? I'd just be gluing it to the vapour barrier which would be pointless, no?

Also, I've read some various things. For scewing the board up, should I start inside out? Does that refer to inside joist and then outwards?

I guess my question is, should I start in the middle of the board, and do a whole joist and then work outwards. Or should I start on a middle joist, and go outwards first, then finish off the rows?

Thanks,
Charlie
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Old 03-25-2013, 09:17 AM   #21
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Screw your board around the out side perimeter this will hold the board up then you can remove the lift or just let go. Then you can screw the field. And yes with the vapor barrier the glue wouldn't do anything.
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Old 03-25-2013, 10:12 AM   #22
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Thanks ToolSeeker.
Do you guys advise to use Nails at the edges rather than screws from your experience, as I've read a few places? Also, if able, can I use screws and stay a 1/2" or inch inside from the edge? Where I can? Or will that make the joint more likely to crack or something?
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Old 03-25-2013, 10:29 AM   #23
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We almost always use screws because they almost eliminate pops. That simply means they won't come loose over time like nails have a tendency to do. And a 1/2" from the edge should be fine as long as you hit the stud behind. and then when you tape your tape will cover the screws and you don't have to do them separate.
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Old 03-25-2013, 10:32 AM   #24
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Thanks! Good point about the tape. Since I'm perpendicular to the joists ont he ceiling, I can stay away from the edge and not crush it. Thats the reason I ask. Other than in the corrners and what not. I would much rather use scews, so that's good news!
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Old 03-26-2013, 10:01 AM   #25
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I've read horizontal is (generally) the favoured and proper way to go. However, this results in some butt joints which a novice like me would have a hard time with mudding. However, if I go vertical, I can perhaps end up with all tapered joints, and might be able to take a crack at it myself.

Should I get a 12' sheet and give it a try to see if I can get it into the room? That would be best right, go horizontal with that bad boy? one nice long tapered joint? (are tapered joints or butt joints better in corners?). The shorter walls in the room, I should go horizontal as well, correct?

Lastly, ceiling. Are ceilings ALWAYS hung perpendicular to the joists? Seems as though that would be easier yes?
Your assessment is right on. If you have a wall that is over 8' but under 12' then optimal is two 12's and only one seam to mud.

If you can't fit 12's into the room or thru stairs, then go 3 sheets vertical and have two tapered seams to mud (easy).

Worst would be short sheets horizontal, creating a long horizontal seam and two butt vertical seams.

Any wall under 8' just use 8'ers horizontal. (unless it's a really short wall like the back of a closet - 5' or so - for that I would not burn two 8' sheets... I'd do vertical, still have one seam, but have a nice 8'x3' piece left instead of two useless 4'x3' pieces).

If your ceiling is greater than 8' by greater than 8', then nothing you can do (shy of getting 12's) will avoid having butt joints on the ceiling.

Try a 12'er. You'd be amazed where it'll fit. I couldn't believe I was able to get 12'ers down a basement staircase and flip a U-turn around a post. Take off your handrail on the stairs, it'll get you 3 more inches.

If you only need 11', you can cut 12' down to 11' first and that's only 3' longer than an 8'er instead of 4' longer.

Tapered vs butt in the corner doesn't matter. Some ppl say it does... I don't notice a difference doing either there.

Either way you can do it yourself. A butt joint is not the end of the world and is only marginally more difficult. The real goal is limiting the # of joints so you simply have less to mud and tape. It's time consuming and gets old fast when you start. I end up wishing it was done when I'm only half-way thru.
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:11 AM   #26
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If your new to dry wall stay away from vertical your not saving anything on how much you tape and mud same amount of linear feet. Beveled inside corners are a pain in the butt! to much to build out. when your house settles or the studds expand or contract the seams tend to crack and pop not fun. horizontal is just fine. the number one thing is to make it work right. Just take your time go on to you tube watch Videos from Myron furguson that Drywall guy. and it will help you understand things better.
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:57 AM   #27
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Thanks Squishy.
I'm definitely going with vertical on the long wall with only two floor to ceiling tapered joints. The other walls I can all cover horizontal, but I'll keep your point in mind about saving more valuable pieces.

Out of curiosity what would you suggest around a door. The wall the door is on is less than 8 feet but more than 4. Would you go two pieces horizontal? Which would end up being 3 pieces because the bottom one would be split in two? Or would you do two vertical pieces, so that there were in the end only two L shaped pieces?

The ceiling, I can go wall to wall perpendicular to the joists with a 8 footer (it's about 7 and a bit), so that works out well. I end up with two full pieces on the ceiling and one small piece.

I love this site and appreciate all the advice, help and suggestions, I learn a lot!
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:00 PM   #28
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Nailbags,

What if I went vertical, and cut the board prior to putting it in the corners? Then I'd have a cut edge in either corner? Is that better than bevelled? Possibly not as good as non-bevelled factory edge?

At the end of the day, I'm not even sure I'm going to mud myself.. I figure my first time, probably new bathroom is not the best lol. Maybe in the garage. :O)
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:18 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieR View Post
Out of curiosity what would you suggest around a door. The wall the door is on is less than 8 feet but more than 4. Would you go two pieces horizontal? Which would end up being 3 pieces because the bottom one would be split in two? Or would you do two vertical pieces, so that there were in the end only two L shaped pieces?
I think it's a wash there. I would probly go horizontal, cuz if this is a 7'6 wall w 30" door, then your lower side pcs are 2'-3' and it's a good opportunity to use up some cuts you've got lying around that won't fit anywhere else. That saves you a whole sheet and is less to throw away.

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