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Old 05-30-2011, 11:05 PM   #1
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Drywall tip needed


My drywall skills are lacking. here are some common things I encounter when I'm drywalling.

1.) I can't get the smooth finish like the pros do. I use the mud with the tape. After mudding the tape on, the tape shows (you can see it through the thin layer of mud)! I smack on more mud, but then it becomes too much. If i sand down, then sometimes I sand too much and get to the tape. Plus I don't see how pros can get it to where the thickness of the tape doesn't show. I mean..........there's something underneath, it's going to show right?

2.) Sometimes I get a "bubble" in the drywall tape after mudding. I can't get rid of it. How do I avoid it.

That's it for now. Please offer some tips so I can improve my skills.

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Old 05-31-2011, 06:19 AM   #2
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Drywall tip needed


There is a LOT of info here if you search---

Here is a very brief 'how to' on taping.

Three different muds---

Powdered easy sand--20-45-90 minute set--Very hard,used to pack holes and voids before taping. Also used to fill corner bead---sometimes used for first coat after taping.

All purpose---Green lid---hard to sand---contains glue and is used to set the paper. Sometimes used for first coat after taping.

Light weight--blue lid--easy to sand--used for top coats--slow drying.


Steps---Pack all cracks and voids with the powdered mix.

Apply tape with the all purpose--some like to thin the mix with a little water. Apply a line of mud with your 6" blade----press paper into mud with the same blade ---using the mud that squeezes out as you set the paper--add a very thin coat to the top of the paper.

After that is set use the all purpose or bag mix for the first thin coat on top of the paper.use a 6" or 8" blade.

When set --switch to the lightweight and add two more thin coats using the 12" blade-(6 is fine for inside corners.

That's it--Use the search button--Willie T BJB Atlanta and many others have long write ups on taping.--Mike---

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Old 05-31-2011, 08:36 PM   #3
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Drywall tip needed


I think my biggest mistake was not pressing enough mud out from under the tape. End result left bulges, and if you know what you're looking for, you'll see every line where drywall boards meet. And you kinda want to build it up with every coat, taking each coat out further than the last to blend it with the rest of the wall (hence the bigger blades). And from what I read, the size of the knife should be the width you are on each side of the joint. Not run down the center. Even the pro's don't have a perfectly flat wall in the end. They just know how to hide it by blending it.
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Old 06-02-2011, 09:20 AM   #4
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Drywall tip needed


Search, search, search.

Many of us have written literally thousands of words on this subject. All you have to do is activate the SEARCH function to find the many posts.
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Old 06-02-2011, 07:16 PM   #5
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Drywall tip needed


I don't think the search engine works as well as some people think it does. Maybe in each section there should be a nice written detailed explanation of how to do these things, and everyone could just ask some of the more specific questions, rather than the general questions.

Just a suggestion.
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Old 06-03-2011, 01:44 AM   #6
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Drywall tip needed


1. You should not worry about covering up the tape on your first coat. The purpose of your first coat is to imbed the tape. You shouldn't worry about seeing the tape at this point. I spread a 6 inch line of mud on the joint, roll my tape on, press the tape (or "imbed" the tape) into the mud, scooping up the excess that squeezes out as you go. Don't go on too heavy unless you have a fetish for sanding drywall.

I usually go over it again quickly, again just doing a thin layer, 6'', and you can still see the tape. You have to remember that this is just the first coat, and the following coats will add more coverage with each one and you should feather it out as you go. Better to go on thin with each coat and feather out, that way sanding is a minimum and not necessary between first and second coat if done light enough.

2. You get those bubbles because the tape is not imbed properly. You either did not have enough mud to bed the tape in, or you did not properly adhere the tape to the board. My guess would be not enough mud underneath.
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Old 06-03-2011, 08:35 AM   #7
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Drywall tip needed


CLICK HERE for some possible help.
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Old 08-16-2011, 03:01 PM   #8
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I agree. The search is not very easy to use. I have been trying to find maximum thickness of drywall mud. I know it has to be here somewhere! Search = frustration!!
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Old 08-17-2011, 08:41 AM   #9
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Drywall tip needed


I agree that the 'search' feature is one step from useless----

Don't feel bad posting a question that has already been answered----It gives us an excuse to tell new people to use the search button.
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Old 08-22-2011, 04:22 PM   #10
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The "maximum thickness of drywall mud" question is pretty much like asking "how long is a rope"?? It depends on too many variables for one answer. You could search a manufacturer's web sites, but I doubt you'll find an answer there either....

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