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Old 03-19-2011, 05:22 PM   #1
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Drywall Repair Questions


I'm sure these questions have been asked many times here but I have been unable to find anything. Probably because I don't know all the terms.

I've done quite a bit of painting so I'd like to think I'm pretty good at prep work and repairing drywall damage. I'm getting ready to do some more painting and I have some problems I have not dealt with before.

About ten years ago I had a roof leak that cause some minor damage to the ceiling. Near one of the spots there is some minor sagging which I plan to shore up with drywall screws. The problem is that on some nails I have "sink holes" (I do not know the correct term) which I think are the opposite of nail pops. The nail heads are not exposed. How do I fix these?

I've always struggled with chipping wall corners. Mine have metal caps with putty over them. Could someone explain the best way to do this right?

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Old 03-19-2011, 06:09 PM   #2
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Your 'sink holes' are caused by the wet drywall sagging away from the screws---

You are going to have to float that area with drywall compound if you wish to save the old baggy drywall.

Corner bead should be filled with Durrabond (the powdered mix)--it's quite hard and resists chipping and popping.

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Old 03-19-2011, 07:04 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hurriken View Post
I'm sure these questions have been asked many times here but I have been unable to find anything. Probably because I don't know all the terms.

I've done quite a bit of painting so I'd like to think I'm pretty good at prep work and repairing drywall damage. I'm getting ready to do some more painting and I have some problems I have not dealt with before.

About ten years ago I had a roof leak that cause some minor damage to the ceiling. Near one of the spots there is some minor sagging which I plan to shore up with drywall screws. The problem is that on some nails I have "sink holes" (I do not know the correct term) which I think are the opposite of nail pops. The nail heads are not exposed. How do I fix these?
Mike is correct in that "Your 'sink holes' are caused by the wet drywall sagging away from the screws or nails". Before coating you first need to add screws to suck the sagging sheets back up. You may have to start where the drywall is tight to the rafters and work your way across. If you start at the saggiest part your screws may keep popping before sucking it tight due to the sheetrock now being dried in a deformed sag.

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I've always struggled with chipping wall corners. Mine have metal caps with putty over them. Could someone explain the best way to do this right?
I wish I could see pics of your chipping corners so I could be sure.

Anyways if your corners are metal clinch-on style or any other fully metal cornerbead, then I believe what you are talking about is quite common (with metal bead). This is due to the very corner of the bead is bare metal after the sanding is done. After painted the very corner of the beaded edge does have its paint chipped off fairly easily when bumped with furniture, etc.

Note: If the chips are not just on the very edge of the corner and popped on the sides of the metal bead then it was not installed properly to avoid this

Clinch-on cornerbead:


The beadex type cornerbead which is metal reinforced paper backed bead usually does not experience the paint chipping of the very corner of the bead due to the paper outside that helps bond the paint to the very corner edge.

Beadex cornerbeads:

Last edited by MnDrywallRanger; 03-19-2011 at 07:09 PM.
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Old 03-20-2011, 02:26 PM   #4
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Your absolutely correct. I tried to screw the drywall back to the ceiling last night and it kept popping the screws. Its isn't a big area, probably 2x2, so I think the ultimate fix is replace that section. However, there is a nearby wall that I most likely tear into when I start my remodel in a few years. (were hoping for summer 2012) so I will replace it then. My father suggested that I soak it using a spray bottle and then screw a peice of plywood up there and let it dray. After it dries remove the plywood, add screws, and finish. I'm not sure if that would work or not.

Here are a couple pictures of the corners. be aware that I scraped away loose material.

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Old 03-20-2011, 03:55 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hurriken View Post
Your absolutely correct. I tried to screw the drywall back to the ceiling last night and it kept popping the screws. Its isn't a big area, probably 2x2, so I think the ultimate fix is replace that section. However, there is a nearby wall that I most likely tear into when I start my remodel in a few years. (were hoping for summer 2012) so I will replace it then. My father suggested that I soak it using a spray bottle and then screw a peice of plywood up there and let it dray. After it dries remove the plywood, add screws, and finish. I'm not sure if that would work or not.

Here are a couple pictures of the corners. be aware that I scraped away loose material.

Yes you do have the metal bead I was speaking of. Those chips are clearly from being bumped with furniture, etc.

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Old 03-20-2011, 04:16 PM   #6
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So I should use Durabond on it then?
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Old 03-20-2011, 04:44 PM   #7
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So I should use Durabond on it then?
Yes, it would be a good fill for the chipped out spots. It may even help to put a light film all the way down the very point of the exposed metal corner to help act as a bonder/primer for the paint. Keep in mind you cannot sand durabond so coat it how you want it to look when painted.
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Old 03-20-2011, 04:49 PM   #8
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Keep in mind you cannot sand durabond so coat it how you want it to look when painted.
I am very glad that you said this! I might have really done myself in!
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Old 03-20-2011, 05:05 PM   #9
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mixing small batches of 20 minute in a pan might be enough.
up here durabond comes in 2 versions. a white bag and a brown bag.
brown bag is not sandable
white bag is.
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Old 03-20-2011, 07:40 PM   #10
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Quote:
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mixing small batches of 20 minute in a pan might be enough.
up here durabond comes in 2 versions. a white bag and a brown bag.
brown bag is not sandable
white bag is.
The brown bag is a true durabond....as stated on the bag.

Here is a pic of the brown bag...


The white bag is a USG product called "Easysand" that comes in different setting times just like durabond but is not durabond. It does not bond like durabond. It does dry harder than regular joint compound and is still sandable either wet or dry....wet being when the product is just set up to hardness but not completely dry.

It is a "slang" term for drywallers to call the white bag Easysand "Durabond" too....for whatever reason or how it caught on...who knows?

The white bag Easysand would flake right off the metal so I would not use it to act as a bonder as stated in previous post. I do use Easysand quite often for prefill in sheetrock gaps, blowouts, etc before I tape a job.

Here is a pic of the white bag...

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Old 03-20-2011, 08:45 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hurriken View Post
Your absolutely correct. I tried to screw the drywall back to the ceiling last night and it kept popping the screws. Its isn't a big area, probably 2x2, so I think the ultimate fix is replace that section. However, there is a nearby wall that I most likely tear into when I start my remodel in a few years. (were hoping for summer 2012) so I will replace it then. "My father suggested that I soak it using a spray bottle and then screw a peice of plywood up there and let it dray. After it dries remove the plywood, add screws, and finish. I'm not sure if that would work or not."
Interesting....I'm sure it would work. But how will you soak it through the paint? Can you access the sag from the attic? Never thought of it that way....
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Old 03-20-2011, 11:46 PM   #12
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I tried putting screws in it again tonight. I think the best thing is to replace that section.
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:25 AM   #13
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I tried putting screws in it again tonight. I think the best thing is to replace that section.
I was thinking that would be an easier fix....
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:49 AM   #14
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However...I have never taped before. But I have did take care of a wall that someone else taped but did not sand.

So...

1) Cut out the area to be replaced.
2) Clean the studs and trim the exposed drywall.
3) Cut a piece to fit the opening but not snug.
4) Screw it in place.
5) Use joint compound to fill the gaps and tape the seams.
6) After it dries sand and add some more compound dry and sand until finished.

How does that sound?
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:52 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Hurriken View Post
However...I have never taped before. But I have did take care of a wall that someone else taped but did not sand.

So...

1) Cut out the area to be replaced.
2) Clean the studs and trim the exposed drywall.
3) Cut a piece to fit the opening but not snug.
4) Screw it in place.
5) Use joint compound to fill the gaps and tape the seams.
6) After it dries sand and add some more compound dry and sand until finished.

How does that sound?
Pretty much sums it up....any texture on the ceiling to match in?

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