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Old 10-27-2011, 03:46 PM   #1
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Drywall question.


Hey guys, new to the forum and just had a question about drywall. I have a chalet in the Poconos that was build in the mid 70's. So every room is wood paneling. I pulled off a light switch cover and found drywall, So I started pulling the paneling down. The drywall is in great shape, however it is unfinished (not taped or mudded). I would like to just finish the existing drywal and paint, however my issue is because the paneling was 1/8" thick, the jambs now sit 1/8" out from the drywall. It appears that the drywall is 1/2" thick. Is there a way to level the drywall with the Jambs or should I just tear everything out and hang fresh drywall? Sorry for the long post any help will be greatly appreciated.

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Old 10-27-2011, 03:55 PM   #2
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Drywall question.


You could build that out with mud. Nobody around here ever complains about the jambs being out 1/8". We always seem to get them in an 1/8".

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Old 10-27-2011, 03:59 PM   #3
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Drywall question.


You will have to remove the door and window casing material. Most casing materials have a relief in the backside for ease of installation when drywall doesn't exactly agree with the location of the jamb material. With only 1/8" to worry about there is a chance that you won't have to do anything. The casing may go right back in place and have just a slight roll to it that it didn't have before but it won't be noticeable.

Check it out and see if I'm correct.

If there is still an undesirable small gap then all you would have to do is to run the casing material on a table saw using a dado blade and cut the relief a little deeper.

Let us know what happens.
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Old 10-29-2011, 04:48 AM   #4
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Drywall question.


My first thought would be to plane the jambs flush. Mud will work too, considering you are mudding everywhere else. Anything so that the casing will sit properly against the jamb. Any small gaps can be caulked if it's paint grade trim.
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Old 10-29-2011, 06:00 AM   #5
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Drywall question.


Add a thin strip of wood to the new trims ---kind of like a 'trim extender'

Done carefully no one will notice and the trims will look a bit thicker.
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Old 10-29-2011, 07:49 AM   #6
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Drywall question.


That's a lot to float out with mud. I would try some screen moulding or a ripped piece of wood behind the outside edge of the casing. You almost never have have this problem as it's usually the opposite. Consider yourself lucky.
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Old 10-29-2011, 02:54 PM   #7
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Drywall question.


Please don't pay attention to my answer above, didn't quite read it right

some good answers above...
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:32 PM   #8
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Again!
I would be surprised if anything had to be done. One way to find out.
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Old 10-29-2011, 04:48 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
You will have to remove the door and window casing material. Most casing materials have a relief in the backside for ease of installation when drywall doesn't exactly agree with the location of the jamb material. With only 1/8" to worry about there is a chance that you won't have to do anything. The casing may go right back in place and have just a slight roll to it that it didn't have before but it won't be noticeable.

Check it out and see if I'm correct.

If there is still an undesirable small gap then all you would have to do is to run the casing material on a table saw using a dado blade and cut the relief a little deeper.

Let us know what happens.
Well, for me, I would first need a table saw, second, know how to use it, third,find out what a dado blade was, fourth, figure out what a relief cut was.



Better yet,

I think I would call in a carpenter


Or even better, do what you said first( THAT ,I could understand!) and hopefully move on
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Old 10-29-2011, 05:20 PM   #10
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This is a DIY website. Why are you here then? Apparently you are taking on something you have no business doing yourself. I think you are correct - call a carpenter.
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Old 10-30-2011, 10:20 AM   #11
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Drywall question.


Thanks for the great help guys. Upon pulling the rest of the paneling down we saw that the drywall was just haphazardly thrown up. Gaps between the panels some as big as 3/8". It was nailed up instead of drywall screws, which was common place in the mid-70's. And we want to wire for an overhead light, right now the switch controls an outlet. So we might do a complete tear down and rehang the room. This will also give us a chance to replace/upgrade the insulation on the 2 outside walls. I'll keep you updated with the progress and hopefully get some pics up.

Tim.
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Old 11-08-2011, 07:08 AM   #12
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Drywall question.


Just for the record, I'm with Bud on his approach. Even though the problem is now moot, it's interesting to talk about solutions.

Much easier to simply deepen the dado on all the trim than to plane the jambs or add more wood and whatnot

And you don't need a table saw. Just buy router and build a jig for running the trim through. 45 minutes to build the jig and another 45 to run all the material.

Then again, I totally partial to solutions in which buying a new tool saves me money and time. Mostly because I get a new tool.

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