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Old 09-27-2012, 08:48 AM   #1
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Drywall project: New basement bathroom


I'm coming along slowly but finally I am starting to plan the drywall portion of this project. I have been reading some threads in this forum and have learned a few things already.

I never knew there was mildew / moisture resistant drywall. That seems like an obvious fit for any bathroom / basement drywall project. Mildew resistant was a little over $2 more for a 1/2 x 4 x 8 sheet. Expensive but not as bad as I thought it might be.

Now for a few questions:

I am aware of the T brace for helping with putting up the ceiling, and I think I read that the ceiling should go in first, then the side from the top down. Is this correct? Should I use the same thickness of drywall for the ceiling as for the walls?

What are the advantages of using screws vs nails?

Is there any advantage to using 12' sheets instead of 8' sheets for a project like this?

I've seen glue mentioned in more than one thread but still not sure why or where you glue. Please elaborate on where and when you should use glue in addition to screws or nails. What kind of glue do you use for this?

Any other tips for a first time drywaller would be appreciated.

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Old 09-27-2012, 10:10 AM   #2
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Drywall project: New basement bathroom


use the longest sheet you need so you don't have butt joints. if you

need 11'2 buy a 12 foot sheet. yes ceiling first then you can butt the top

wall pieces up tight against it. for 16" centers you can 1/2" on the ceiling

and on the walls. do not use drywall around the shower under the tile

unless you plan to cover it with kerdi or similar. 1/2 cement board with

waterproofing will work also. moisture resistant does not mean

waterproof.

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Old 09-29-2012, 08:02 PM   #3
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Drywall project: New basement bathroom


Thanks Danny. That helps. I have a prefab shower already in place. Not using tile. How about the glue and screw vs nails info please.
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Old 09-30-2012, 08:22 AM   #4
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Drywall project: New basement bathroom


If you use glue (it will say dry wall adhesive right on the tube) you can use less screws so there's less patching to do and there's less chance of screw pops and saging.

Screws hold far better then nails.
You can buy a bit that will set the screws just below the surface that will fit in your drill for a few bucks.
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...4175E7&first=1
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:05 AM   #5
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Drywall project: New basement bathroom


One tip I would give is since this is a bathroom in a basement, on the bottom sheet I would leave about a 1/2" gap between the floor and the bottom of that sheet, just in case of overflow of shower, toilet, or sink, it won't be able to wick up in the drywall. And your baseboard will hide it.
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Old 10-01-2012, 06:06 PM   #6
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Great tips guys. Thank you!!!!!!! I'm finishing up the electric side of things and then I'll be ready to get started with the dry wall. Looking things over closer tonight I notice that for the extreme shower that we put in (3 different shower heads) we had to put one 3/4 piece of copper below the joist for all to fit as I needed it. At the time I was thinking I'd go with a drop ceiling. I have since changed my mind but now I have a 3/4 piece of copper with a saddle holding it to the joist right over the shower. I hate to drop the entire ceiling by enough to clear the copper. Plus I do need an access point in that general area to get to shut off valves that are in the ceiling.
How would you solve a problem like this. I can get a pic if that would help.
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Old 10-01-2012, 06:20 PM   #7
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Drywall project: New basement bathroom


Quote:
Originally Posted by ToolSeeker
One tip I would give is since this is a bathroom in a basement, on the bottom sheet I would leave about a 1/2" gap between the floor and the bottom of that sheet, just in case of overflow of shower, toilet, or sink, it won't be able to wick up in the drywall. And your baseboard will hide it.
This is a must! Particularly for a basment.
This will also help with carpet installation if you choose to put carpet down.
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:43 AM   #8
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Yep, I agree Subline2. :agree: I will be sure to do just that.

My current dilemma is the 3/4" copper pipe that was hung below the joist. I don't want to lower the entire ceiling by an inch, but I'll need to in the area over the tub. Looking for ideas on how to get past this issue.
How would you tie the two different heights together. I would probably just lower the part over the tub. But hoping for other insights.
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:55 AM   #9
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Can you run the pipe through the joist and re-attach it using sharkbites.no need to solder/ sweat pipes.
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Old 10-02-2012, 10:00 AM   #10
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Can you run the pipe through the joist and re-attach it using sharkbites.no need to solder/ sweat pipes.
Not sure. I'll take a pic tonight and post it. It has a T that is also under the joist ...but if possible to raise that would be the best solution. I don't mind sweating joints but sharkbites do come in handy for sure. thanks for the thought.
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Old 10-02-2012, 10:02 AM   #11
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I found a pic of the mess, it reminded me I also have a gas line to deal with.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:03 PM   #12
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It looks like the pipe directly above the low one is dead if it is cut it out and run the other pipe true the hole in the joist.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:37 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NetTractorTalk
I found a pic of the mess, it reminded me I also have a gas line to deal with.
I see you have already done some framing to the left.
It may be easier to add some 1x2 to the joist with the pipe and just lower the ceiling in that area.
There is a pipe below the gas line that is also below the joist,not an issue?
As for that shut off valve, they sell access panels that are not very noticeable that attach to the rock ( liquid nails) to give you future access to that shutoff.
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Old 10-03-2012, 10:12 AM   #14
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Toolseeker, no dead / empty or unused pipes in the pic. All carry water to somewhere. I have three shower fixtures / controls plumbed for this shower. Seemed like a neat idea and drawing the plumbing out on paper was a breeze. Actually installing it got a bit trickier. I have two fixtures at one end and one fixture at the opposite end. Lots of pipes going every which direction. Ran most in 3/4 so volume would be there for each fixture.

Sublime, that is what I have been thinking, add 1 x2's to the bottom of the joists to attach the drywall to. I'm thinking of just doing the drop over the tub itself. So I would have a 1" board showing / outlining the tub. Considering putting tile there to match the tile that will be on the step into the shower, and the frame face at the bottom of the shower. Seems like that would work.
Does that sound feasible and like a good idea to you guys? What am I missing?
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Old 10-03-2012, 10:24 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NetTractorTalk
Toolseeker, no dead / empty or unused pipes in the pic. All carry water to somewhere. I have three shower fixtures / controls plumbed for this shower. Seemed like a neat idea and drawing the plumbing out on paper was a breeze. Actually installing it got a bit trickier. I have two fixtures at one end and one fixture at the opposite end. Lots of pipes going every which direction. Ran most in 3/4 so volume would be there for each fixture.

Sublime, that is what I have been thinking, add 1 x2's to the bottom of the joists to attach the drywall to. I'm thinking of just doing the drop over the tub itself. So I would have a 1" board showing / outlining the tub. Considering putting tile there to match the tile that will be on the step into the shower, and the frame face at the bottom of the shower. Seems like that would work.
Does that sound feasible and like a good idea to you guys? What am I missing?
Sounds like a plan to me.
Pics when you finish!

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