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Old 01-01-2011, 12:59 AM   #1
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Drywall over Drywall..


Hi everyone! I will begin this post by saying that I am not a very handy handyman, however I have worked with drywall before, alas that was quite a few years ago. Regardless, I decided to help out my neighbour and but some drywall up for her to earn some money for a trip, and I was hoping one of the experienced people on this site could give me some instructions and tips on how I can go about drywalling over drywall. I have put up drywall before, but never over drywall. Any help would be very much appreciated!

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Old 01-01-2011, 05:49 AM   #2
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Drywall over Drywall..


Not something I would ever recommend or do myself.

The new drywall edge needs to cover half of the stud and the adjoining piece the same. Aligning a sheet to allow screwing it into half of a covered stud isn't easy to do unless your marking each existing piece of drywall to show the butt joint. Even then, it's hit and miss, literally.

All the trim, baseboard, window and door, needs to be removed. That's the only way you'll find a stud to screw the edges of the new drywall into. The gap created from the new drywall will need a new trim piece inside the windows and doors to fill the gap created by the new drywall.

Experienced folks would remove the existing drywall and do the job right. For my 2 the two of you are about to enter a nightmare of a project.

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Old 01-01-2011, 07:18 AM   #3
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Drywall over Drywall..


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Originally Posted by Shamus View Post
Not something I would ever recommend or do myself.

The new drywall edge needs to cover half of the stud and the adjoining piece the same. Aligning a sheet to allow screwing it into half of a covered stud isn't easy to do unless your marking each existing piece of drywall to show the butt joint. Even then, it's hit and miss, literally.

All the trim, baseboard, window and door, needs to be removed. That's the only way you'll find a stud to screw the edges of the new drywall into. The gap created from the new drywall will need a new trim piece inside the windows and doors to fill the gap created by the new drywall.

Experienced folks would remove the existing drywall and do the job right. For my 2 the two of you are about to enter a nightmare of a project.

Here is your two sense back. lets say you have 8ft tall ceilings. You can use quarter inch dry the whole way up and just hang it vertically. remebering studs should be 16 inches apart, if you find one stud. take a drywall saw and cut till you reach both ends of the stud from each direction. take a level and go right down the center and draw a line. make sure the studs are not crooked in anyway so check from top to bottom. you may want to put in electical socket extensions first btw for fire hazard risk. I had a crew of 3 do this and we hung around 12 sheets in about a day and finished them. Yes it can be done. Its easier then tearing out the drywall because you will have the same steps and less mess. But it is still a project for a non professional.

Keep this in mind- a home is not something you should go cheap on. It is a 100k investment in the least. so there is nothing wrong with spendind a little money to get the job done right. especially with the finishing. I have never seen an amateur finisher do the finishing correctly. They think it looks great and are very proud that they did it themselves, then they paint it and they see every little crappy thing they missed. and trust me it is alot!

Take this advice to heart. i have given you both the pro and the con.
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:30 AM   #4
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Drywall over Drywall..


Make sure you glue with construction adhesive and you will be fine
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:44 PM   #5
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There are many things that need to be addressed with going over existing sheetrock. You will need to get extensions for you electrical boxes. Doors and windows come into play. Depending on what you will do with the jambs and casing. They can have L metal put on them and mudded in, or will you be replacing them? 1/2 sheetrock is cheaper and easier to work with than 1/4 but will that application work for you everywhere? If you use 1/2, then you don't have to worry about finding the studs because you can beat a hole in the wall where every you want because you will be covering it up with new rock.

Of course you will want to use a longer screw, (nails only when necessary). 1 5/8" screws or longer.

If you are doing the ceiling, remember that if you have 2' centers you will need 5/8 rock.
There are rock to rock screws to be used where wood is not available.
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Old 01-10-2011, 01:34 PM   #6
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Drywall over Drywall..


Agree with Stoner's method with 1/4" board. I'd use glue and nails/screws. Pull the base and replace, butt to the door/window casing and flat tape to avoid having to extend jambs.
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Old 01-10-2011, 08:32 PM   #7
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Drywall over Drywall..


Long screws and a generous use of a construction adhesive should do the trick as far as the board is concerned. But joints on studs. There are some places where double drywall is standard on high end homes. Better sound profing. The interior door jams and window liners are made to accomodate the thicker walls. As far as your doors and other obstacles for finishing is concerned I hope there is not to much to deal with

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