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-   -   Drywall nail types (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/drywall-nail-types-112100/)

kevsprojects 07-27-2011 05:08 AM

Drywall nail types
 
Hi,

I'm go to be installing lots of drywall and have a question about drywall nail coatings. I've always used phosphate coated nails in the past but, is the anything about the "blued" drywall nails thats worth noting. Is one preferable to the other?

mikegp 07-27-2011 09:21 AM

Screws. You want screws.

Jessidog 07-27-2011 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikegp (Post 694668)
Screws. You want screws.

+1 - Use screws!

David

TrapperL 07-27-2011 12:03 PM

Blued nails comes from way back in time. It was to keep the nails from rusting in the lumber yards open bins. The nails were not a fast mover in those days but then again, nothing was a fast mover. They will rust like any other blued surface on steel. No advantages to using them. You need to remember that when these came about, there was little A/C around and most often the nail bin was outside in a lumber shed. At one time we had a drywall screw called a buttercup. Instead of a flat head, it was concave. It didn't break the paper as easily and it gave an area for the float. I've probably seen 10+ different styles of drywall nails over the years. Screws are the best.

AGWhitehouse 07-27-2011 12:13 PM

x4 screws

DangerMouse 07-27-2011 02:22 PM

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DM

kevsprojects 07-27-2011 03:47 PM

but, but
 
I know I know - its all about the screw thing :no:, but I'm faster with a good weighted hammer and a pouch full of nails. I cant really explain that but I think its related to a back operation I had 4 years ago. The pushing force of the screw gun really torques my back, yet I can swing the hammer with ease!
Guess I'm one of the ancient nailers!

DangerMouse 07-27-2011 03:53 PM

I put up ALL my drywall with a variable speed cordless drill.
Hardly any pressure needed at all.

DM

kevsprojects 07-27-2011 04:16 PM

Thanks TrapperL for the info, I forgot to put that on the last post. Just curious why they made a bright shinny nail either - same reason I guess.

Yea, I should probably do some more experimenting on the old drywall in the garage with a good VSR drill. It always felt like the screw gun was in charge of me rather than me in charge of it :eek: Thank god for old crusty drywall for training purposes!

AGWhitehouse 07-27-2011 04:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevsprojects (Post 694998)
Yea, I should probably do some more experimenting on the old drywall in the garage with a good VSR drill. It always felt like the screw gun was in charge of me rather than me in charge of it :eek: Thank god for old crusty drywall for training purposes!

Investigate renting one of those cartridge sheetrock guns. Don't know if the rental $ is worth it, but I see guys putting in screws way faster than nails because the screws are all pre-loaded.

kevsprojects 07-28-2011 07:23 AM

There may be hope!
 
After some experimentation, I found that my old (really old) cordless drill weighs almost twice as much as my corded B&D drill :eek:. I'm sure a really nice properly balanced cordless drill would work, but right now I'm pretty satisfied with my corded drill. Nice control and precise torquing on every screw. Now just trying to master the art of getting them just flush with the face paper and not over driven.

While you here ~ what really is the proper size screw for:

1/2" thick regular sheets, 16" oc studs?,

and,

5/8" type X fire coded sheets, 16" oc studs/joist as well as 24" oc studs/joist?

I will be doing walls that are 16" oc & ceilings that are 24" oc.

Shouldn't it be 1-1/2" length for 1/2" & 2" length for 5/8".???

DangerMouse 07-28-2011 07:36 AM

I believe it's 1 1/2" for 5/8" ceiling sheetrock, but I used 2" too.
And I spaced them much tighter than required.

DM

AGWhitehouse 07-28-2011 08:25 AM

1-5/8" GP screws (Orange boxes at Lowe's or Home Depot). I've never seen 1-1/2" GP's, they come in either 1-1/4 or 1-5/8 at the box stores.

bjbatlanta 07-29-2011 02:29 PM

I nail AND GLUE all wood framing with phosphate coated nails (cupped head). Way less "pops" than with screws. Screws work better in metal stud applications. You don't have the problem with getting the screw "set" just right as you do in wood. One stud is denser than the next, so you push a bit harder to set the screw and you break the face paper. There's a "pop". I'm "old school" though, so hard to change from 35 yrs. of the same method that has worked. Screws are considered the "norm" these days and probably easier for the DIY'er. I would still recommend using ADHESIVE with either method. It will cut down immensely on "pops", whether they be screws or nails. Best of luck.....

AGWhitehouse 07-29-2011 02:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bjbatlanta (Post 696292)
I nail AND GLUE all wood framing with phosphate coated nails (cupped head). Way less "pops" than with screws. Screws work better in metal stud applications. You don't have the problem with getting the screw "set" just right as you do in wood. One stud is denser than the next, so you push a bit harder to set the screw and you break the face paper. There's a "pop". I'm "old school" though, so hard to change from 35 yrs. of the same method that has worked. Screws are considered the "norm" these days and probably easier for the DIY'er. I would still recommend using ADHESIVE with either method. It will cut down immensely on "pops", whether they be screws or nails. Best of luck.....

Glue sheetrock? WOW... I can't imagine the curse words people must use that have to renovate the panels you've hung. Seems very excessive to save yourself from a few nail pops...


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