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Old 06-19-2013, 09:48 AM   #1
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Drywall Knife Question.


I was working on my first big room this past weekend and I had no issues with the 6" knife embedding the tape on the first coat.

The second coat, I was having issues. I'm sure it's due to lack of experience, but I'm curious if the seasoned drywalling vets have something to say about this knife:

http://www.amazon.com/Hyde-10-Inch-H...=drywall+knife

I liked it because the handle is thick and it helps my achy hands, but between scrapping the wall with the edge of the knife and the mud not being spread evenly, I have to wonder if this style of the knife is not really ideal or not really used on the job site?

Again, I'm new and this takes years of practice to master and no one should ever blame their tools and I don't, but just curious if folks out there have had issues with this style knife, especially for beginners.

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Old 06-19-2013, 09:53 AM   #2
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Drywall Knife Question.


That's what I use.
SS is more expensive but it's not going to rust up.

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Old 06-19-2013, 04:47 PM   #3
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Drywall Knife Question.


When I used knifes that is the one I used along with a 12".
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Old 06-19-2013, 09:24 PM   #4
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Drywall Knife Question.


I only use goldblatt, 10 inch. The carbon steel has just the right spring to it. They have been making drywall tools forever, I think they know what they are doing. You just use a brillo pad to remove rust.

Hint: Never use the knife dry, that is, with no mud on it. It will pull. You only use the 6 to bed the tape on seams, and in corners. Then you use the 10 to clean off residual, and all other coats.

Temper and mix the mud every day.
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Old 06-19-2013, 09:27 PM   #5
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Drywall Knife Question.


In my experience, 6" is best for the first embedding coat, 10" for the second coat, and 12" for the farthest feathered out third coat. That's for standard seams in the open field - there are exceptions for other cases. You can go bigger than that if it helps you, but not smaller. For example, you could use a 10" on the first coat, but I'd find that uncomfortable. I'd want to focus my pressure right over the joint.
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Old 06-19-2013, 09:32 PM   #6
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Drywall Knife Question.


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Originally Posted by jagans View Post
You only use the 6 to bed the tape on seams, and in corners. Then you use the 10 to clean off residual, and all other coats.
I don't think the 10" will give you a wide enough taper for the third coat.

I like Myron's stuff
http://www.finehomebuilding.com/PDF/Free/021164076.pdf
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Old 06-20-2013, 09:42 AM   #7
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Drywall Knife Question.


I go in order of size 6,8,10,and 12 if I need it. Most people love that orange peel texture so for me it is tape with 6" first coat 8 then a light skim feathered out 10 sand and then blast it with orange peel beleck! I do what people pay me to do. Would rather skim coat the walls.
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Old 06-25-2013, 09:56 AM   #8
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Drywall Knife Question.


THanks for the replies. I feel with the 10 my mud consistency may have been off, as when I dragged down vertically I was getting a lot of pitting and the coat was being spread unevenly. Just need more practice and to make sure the pressure is towards the center of the knife as I drag/pull down, I think.
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:05 AM   #9
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Drywall Knife Question.


Personally, I hate finishing seams with a knife. I use a 12" drywall trowell. I only use a knife for corners, but you have to use what works for you.
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Old 06-26-2013, 07:28 AM   #10
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Drywall Knife Question.


I think, with practice, you will find a nice, flexible, wider knife will work better other than for your first tape embedding pass. SS ones are easier to clean but may not be as flexible as regular carbon steel ones. As mentioned, you can deal with the rust and/or leave a thin oil coating on them once clean.

You mention mud consistency and that confused me? Are you using pre-mix or hot mud? I think the hot mud can be a challenge for newbies not yet accustomed to the mud process. And, especially so if you picked something with too fast a cure time.
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:47 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
I think, with practice, you will find a nice, flexible, wider knife will work better other than for your first tape embedding pass. SS ones are easier to clean but may not be as flexible as regular carbon steel ones. As mentioned, you can deal with the rust and/or leave a thin oil coating on them once clean.

You mention mud consistency and that confused me? Are you using pre-mix or hot mud? I think the hot mud can be a challenge for newbies not yet accustomed to the mud process. And, especially so if you picked something with too fast a cure time.
I was using hot mud. I'm starting to appreciate the flexibility over the stiffness of SS.

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