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-   -   Drywall Installation-Finishing-Texturing tips (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/drywall-installation-finishing-texturing-tips-40891/)

Sir MixAlot 03-22-2009 08:40 PM

Drywall Installation-Finishing-Texturing tips
 
I thought I would share some tips and info on drywall. Ive been in the trade for over 20 years. I would be happy to answer any questions on the process. Although I don't know all of the answers , I know some of the other pro's on here most likely will.

First check out these links:

Drywall how to guide
&
Levels of drywall finishing


http://img16.imageshack.us/img16/185...cartoonguy.jpg

Knucklez 03-23-2009 08:14 PM

you know what problem i have with drywall.. is application of mud over tape. first i put some mud on the seam, maybe 1/8" thick and wider than the tape. then i press the tape in and run a dry spatula over the tape so it presses into the mud and no wrinkles.

all seems good.

then, when it drys i use 12" spatula and spread on some mud and i find that the tape bubbles up! you can press on the bubbles and its like it no longer is sticking to the drywall, where just 5minutes ago it was!

so i go to sticky mesh tape instead..

what was i doing wrong?

Knucklez

skizsam 03-24-2009 01:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Knucklez (Post 249095)
you know what problem i have with drywall.. is application of mud over tape. first i put some mud on the seam, maybe 1/8" thick and wider than the tape. then i press the tape in and run a dry spatula over the tape so it presses into the mud and no wrinkles.

all seems good.

then, when it drys i use 12" spatula and spread on some mud and i find that the tape bubbles up! you can press on the bubbles and its like it no longer is sticking to the drywall, where just 5minutes ago it was!

so i go to sticky mesh tape instead..

what was i doing wrong?

Knucklez


I use the sticky yellow mesh tape purchased at lowes. I find that to be the best

RippySkippy 03-24-2009 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Knucklez (Post 249095)
you know what problem i have with drywall.. is application of mud over tape. first i put some mud on the seam, maybe 1/8" thick and wider than the tape. then i press the tape in and run a dry spatula over the tape so it presses into the mud and no wrinkles.

all seems good.

then, when it drys i use 12" spatula and spread on some mud and i find that the tape bubbles up! you can press on the bubbles and its like it no longer is sticking to the drywall, where just 5minutes ago it was!

so i go to sticky mesh tape instead..

what was i doing wrong?

Knucklez

How long are you waiting for the "next" coat? If it's really dry, then it will not bubble up. It could be that your're pressing on the taping knife too hard and pushing the mud out from under it. Then when you put the next coat on, the moisture is allowing it to lift from the drywall.

Have you tried using a durabond for the taping coat? It sets up much like concrete rather than drying like premixed compound. Since I've made the switch...I would never go back to pre-mixed...even for the top coat....use the easy sand dry, mix what you want/need. For small areas and patches, I love the 20 minute mud.

Knucklez 03-25-2009 06:44 PM

i wait atleast 24 hrs before next coat.

but the original coat, i.e. mud between wall & tape, i press the tape down HARD into the mud. maybe yes.. i am squishing out all the mud & then moisture lifts the tape on 2nd coat.

your theory seems to match my experience. could be true. i'll keep this in mind for next time (though my wife is loosing patience with my lack of tape/mud skillz) :thumbsup:

Knucklez

RippySkippy 03-26-2009 09:23 AM

Years ago when I just started messing with this stuff...I found that I over-worked the mud, and would end up with a bigger mess than when I started. Work on your techniques, the key is moderation...don't push too hard...but "hard enough", don't use mud too thin..."but thin enough"...don't over sand...but "sand just enough". Time and experience will provide you with the "enough" parameters...

Everyone has their techniques that work...and no one can make you into a drywall finisher. You have to put in the hours or find yourself a really good mentor...it's not rocket science...but it does require a touch. Hang in there...it'll come to ya...but it will take time....

mark942 03-28-2009 09:08 AM

Any good tips on taping butt sections?

bjbatlanta 03-28-2009 12:30 PM

If your tape bubbles after 24 hrs. of drying, you're not getting enough mud under the tape - a nice even coat. There are voids in there. If you do use mesh (flats only, always paper in the corners) use a setting type compound for AT LEAST the first coat. The EZ sand products available at the big boxes are fine. And a couple of thin coats over the tape are better than trying to pile the mud on to cover with one coat....

skeeter 152 03-28-2009 07:57 PM

anyone use auto taping tools?

bjbatlanta 03-29-2009 08:21 AM

For DIYer's??

Sir MixAlot 03-29-2009 09:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mark942 (Post 251476)
Any good tips on taping butt sections?


Mark, When hand taping on my butt joints, I use fiber tape. 2nd, use a 6" knife and durabond (Place mud about 5"'s wide). let dry. 3rd,use a 12" knife each side of previous coat w/all purpose joint compound (place mud 11"'s wide on each side of seam). Let dry. 4th, sand center and edges lightly. 5th, check for flatness w/ 12" knife by placing horizontally to the seam. 6th, add mud as need for flatness.:thumbsup:

mark942 03-30-2009 06:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir MixAlot (Post 252244)
Mark, When hand taping on my butt joints, I use fiber tape. 2nd, use a 6" knife and durabond (Place mud about 5"'s wide). let dry. 3rd,use a 12" knife each side of previous coat w/all purpose joint compound (place mud 11"'s wide on each side of seam). Let dry. 4th, sand center and edges lightly. 5th, check for flatness w/ 12" knife by placing horizontally to the seam. 6th, add mud as need for flatness.:thumbsup:



Thank you Sir mixalot for reaffirming that it just takes a bit more time to do. I have to admit to having a bit of a bulge at that particular seam. I have even gone as far as beveling the edges with a grader to help this problem. But it all boils down to 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,steps, and maybe 8 in my case. Thanks once again.

Willie T 05-05-2009 09:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RippySkippy (Post 250509)
Years ago when I just started messing with this stuff...I found that I over-worked the mud, and would end up with a bigger mess than when I started. Work on your techniques, the key is moderation...don't push too hard...but "hard enough", don't use mud too thin..."but thin enough"...don't over sand...but "sand just enough". Time and experience will provide you with the "enough" parameters...

Everyone has their techniques that work...and no one can make you into a drywall finisher. You have to put in the hours or find yourself a really good mentor...it's not rocket science...but it does require a touch. Hang in there...it'll come to ya...but it will take time....

The old timers had an expression I learned more than 45 years ago... "Work it long, work it wrong".

Sir MixAlot 06-20-2009 02:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gtglobe (Post 269763)
Useful Links.Thanks for sharing

Glad to be able to help.:thumbsup:

HABSFAN2006 06-29-2009 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir MixAlot (Post 290393)
Glad to be able to help.:thumbsup:


Question for ya... what is the advantage of placing mud in a straight line covering all screws in that specific grid, as opposed to two or three different patches of mud? I noticed some people do this..
is it to trick the eye and eliminate the "patch look" of different mud locations? Seems like more mud than is needed...
also, is it better to have them vertical up/down on a wall application?
I have successfully done the patch methode before & primed/painted with good results...


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