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Old 01-30-2009, 09:12 PM   #16
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


............don't feel stupid........you see all the stupid questions I've asked in the last 2 years........

....and probably more to come.......

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Old 01-30-2009, 09:57 PM   #17
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


And sheetrock actually has a grain to it, like wood does. If you take a 4x8 sheet and cut it into two 4x4 pieces, you can see this take place.

Place two buckets under the ends of one piece, and two more under the sides of the other piece. Then place equal weight in the middle of each of them. Check back later and you'll find that the ones that are supported at the ends bow less than the ones supported at the sides.

Remember the old modular and double-wides that ran the sheetrock parallel with the joists from the middle of the ceiling to the exterior walls? You could always tell where the joists were, cuz the rock sagged in between them.

Of course most walls don't sag very much ... But the general rule is perpendicular to the supporting members.
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Old 01-31-2009, 11:05 AM   #18
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


Also, You never want to place your sheets of drywall directly on a concrete floor. This is a concrete basement floor? It will attract mold when the drywall later sucks up moisture from the colder floors. Besides, not that many floors are truly level, and that will throw off the alignment of all your sheets.
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Old 01-31-2009, 11:22 AM   #19
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


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Originally Posted by perpetualjon View Post
Ahhhh... That makes total sense!! Now I really feel stupid!!
By the way, it's not a stupid question at all. Since you are hanging your ceiling in later, you very well could place the bottom sheets first. But here are the problems involved:
  1. You want to be certain to seal the top edge of the drywall to the ceiling (upper floor bottom) above to eliminate the creation of possible "flame chimneys" in the case of a fire down there. If you do not contain the fire in the lower sections of the house, it will find an opening into the wall cavities and QUICKLY spread upward to the rest of your house.
  2. Because the floor is not going to be level, you would still have to make a level line on your studs and then lift up each lower sheet to align with that chalk line.
  3. With the bottom row in place, you would have to be certain that you left exactly enough room to squeeze in those top sheets. This is even difficult for a pro to do. Better to have any gaps hidden behind the baseboard.
The 2 x 4's seem like a lot of additional work, but it's really only about ten minutes per wall. And it will save you a ton of straining.

BTW..... Leave some gaps in that run of 2 x 4's so you can grip the bottom of the sheet if you need to for slight adjusting movements. And this particular 2 x 4 setup is being mentioned because you don't have to be right up tight with this specific installation due to the hanging ceiling. You just need to assure that there is still a taste over 48" available above the 2 x 4 to get that top sheet in place... the few gaps at the top can be taped and mudded.
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Old 01-31-2009, 02:42 PM   #20
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


Here’s a small drywall hanger’s trick:

Ever notice how some ceiling edges seem to undulate up and down for the length of a wall? This is obviously because the joists or trusses where the drywall is nailed along the edges aren’t level, one with another. Some sit high. Some sit low. So the D/W goes up and down.

Now, quality professionals fir down the whole ceiling with 1 x 3’s installed perpendicular to the joists or trusses. And they shim the whole ceiling level with thin strings called “jet line”. It’s very lightweight, and looks like dental floss. It can be pulled extremely tight so that it is almost perfectly level. This process results in two positive things.

One, it gives you a perfectly flat, level ceiling everywhere. And, two, it helps eliminate the ceiling cracks that eventually develop when temperature or settling cause trusses or joists to move and shift a little. But this process also adds somewhere about 1,500 to 2,000 dollars to the cost of the home. Is there a way around this for us poorer folk?

Yes. At least in part. Providing your building department will allow it (some won’t), you do have a way to make your edges more straight and level than they might otherwise be. We can’t really help the truss or joist movement, but we can help the edge problem.

It is based upon leaving the last 10”, or so, un-nailed along the edges of the ceiling. Now wait... we’re not done.

There are 90 degree clips made just for this purpose. They fit over the backside of the ceiling sheet for an inch or so, and have a parallel lip that fits just under the bottom side of the ceiling sheet to hold it in place on the edge of the sheet... much like plywood clips fit over the edge of a sheet of plywood. But, in addition, there is a 90 degree leg or strap that hangs down the wall in front of each stud.

So, fully installed (it’s much easier than it sounds) you have all these little clips hanging down in front of all the studs, and the 10 or 12 inch edge of the ceiling drywall. The whole edge sags just a little bit.

But... as you install each top sheet snuggly against the ceiling, you lift the ceiling that ¼ to ½ inch so it’s level and straight. It really looks good. Then you simply make sure to get a screw through each clip (They are there behind the wall sheet, waiting to be screwed through, right at the top of each stud.)

Of course, today being the day of the cheapest route possible, most dry wall hangers don’t even know about this method or these clips. And if they DO try to level that edge by leaving that last 10 to 12 inches un-nailed, (some of them have learned this trick) they unfortunately depend upon only the tape and mud to hold the top edge in place. Honestly, that will usually be enough. But it’s not good practice, nor professional.
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Old 01-31-2009, 08:35 PM   #21
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


Very helpful and interesting stuff Willie T!! Thanks for the help.
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Old 02-01-2009, 02:35 PM   #22
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


One of the most important reasons for hanging horizontally may not have been stressed enough.

Wood stud walls are not often flat walls. Prove this yourself by placing a good long straightedge across several studs in your wall, in any direction you choose, either horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. You're going to find bows, warps, and sags. These surface distortions can largely be eliminated or at least reduced by placing your Sheetrock horizontially.

You've just read about the directional strength of Sheetrock. But did you really question why? After all, what's it got to be all that strong for? It's not supporting a thing but its own weight. And it is screwed into place just about everyplace you can see.

The main reason for that horizontal strength is those very wood studs you just checked out. Horizontally placing your board is going to help flatten and level out those studs. It will push in the bows and it will pull outward, the dips and sags. Watch the studs carefully as you screw in a sheet of drywall. You will see the pressure from the screws actually push and pull most of those studs closer into line with each other, making a much more flat and smooth wall surface.

And you stagger the joints for the very same reason. If you should happen to place two butt joints directly above and below each other on the same stud, those two flexible ends would conform to the shape of that one single stud. If it was bowed out, your wall would bow outward there. If it was dipped or sagged inward, your wall would end up with a vertical depression there.

But if you stagger joints, the inherent horizontal strength of the sheet spanning that problem stud will tend to force it into a flatter plane when it is fully screwed into place.

So, there you have it. The main reason to hang horizontally on wood studs is to help make, and keep, the wall flat and straight. If you will notice, almost all commercial work, which is just about always on metal studs, is hung vertically. Why? Because metal studs are engineered to be nice and straight, so there is no reason to go horizontal.
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:35 PM   #23
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


Quote:
Reading all the responses, it seems like structurally it doesn't matter whether I hang the sheets vertically or horizontally
Horizontally will be more structurally sound. Your studs are vertical and you can tie 12' of them together with a horizontal sheet.
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Old 02-01-2009, 07:42 PM   #24
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


They actually make a aluminum drywall lift that is made to put your foot in. It has a rocker so that when you step back on the heel it will hold your sheet and leave you with both hands free. I believe you should be able to get one of these at a hardware store or possibly where ever you get your drywall. Steve
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Old 02-02-2009, 12:20 AM   #25
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


If your ceiling is not already covered, you should do that first.
Then you just push the top row of drywall up against it for a perfect fit.
Get a buddy to help you get the sheets up, put 4 nails in each sheet, then he can go home. Use drywall screws to do the rest. The pros can hang an entire house in half a day, they're amazing to watch.
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Old 04-08-2010, 11:57 AM   #26
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


I've taken 12 foot sheets and "knived" the back side so it can be bent a little to get around corners. When it is put up the "bend" isn't noticeable if it isn't "creased"
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Old 04-08-2010, 12:29 PM   #27
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


The comment about fire stopping drafts got me to thinking. Have you checked the code where you are as it applies to basements in your situation?

We don't have basements here, but are required to have 1 hour ceilings between garages and houses. This is due to both carbon monoxide from the cars as well as gas fumes and we have our hot water heaters and furnaces there.

Do you have these in your basement? Most dropped ceilings wouldn't meet that requirement. Just something to confirm before you get underway.
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Old 04-08-2010, 12:40 PM   #28
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Drywall - Horizontal or vertical


I hung my last drywall job horizontally and it worked better than when I hung it vertically. It was harder to mud when I got higher up the wall, but it was easier to get the seems looking nicer.

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