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Old 10-11-2011, 07:57 AM   #1
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


As requested, this will be a "Sticky" for the Drywall forum to answer Frequently Asked Questions, as well as some helpful Tips and Tricks to help you through your drywall DIY.

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Old 10-11-2011, 10:47 AM   #2
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


1. If you have never done drywall before, don't start before you've either read a decent book (with lots of illustrations). If you don't know what a butt joint is, that's a good sign you need to do more reading. Youtube is also a good source for seeing what things look like, although bear in mind that everyone has their own approach and some videos may contradict each other.

2. Make sure your first effort is small or in a location where results don't matter as much (basement, garage, etc). Your first few times doing taping/mudding are where you will do most of the learning.

3. What is underneath matters a lot. If you're doing a remodel or new project from scratch, make sure you've done your drywall related research first. That "good enough" framing job could end up being an absolute nightmare to drywall.

4. Measure twice, cut once. Just like in carpentry, only moreso. Plan your layout on paper or chalked/pencilled on the studs before you get started.

5. Fixing a small hole might be best addressed by a bigger hole. Depends on location, etc, but if your first time looking at drywall is when you've "got a hole in my drywall I need to fix", there's a good chance that the best way to have it looking nice is to cut a regular shaped section out and screw it in place before going for the mud, tape, etc. (maybe this could have it's own post below, I suspect a lot of google searches want this part answered).

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Old 10-11-2011, 03:26 PM   #3
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


I will start out by bringing you the good news that you no longer have to worry too much what a "Butt Joint" is.

Butt joints used to be the bane of drywall finishers. No longer.

The introduction of a very inexpensive product called a "Butt Board" totally eliminates the need to fight with the heretofor dreaded bump caused by the butt joint standard hanging leaves you to deal with.

You can research and learn about butt boards, but for now, just be happy that they were invented.
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Old 12-10-2011, 03:59 PM   #4
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


Quote:
Originally Posted by wilsonstark View Post
1. If you have never done drywall before, don't start before you've either read a decent book (with lots of illustrations). If you don't know what a butt joint is, that's a good sign you need to do more reading. Youtube is also a good source for seeing what things look like, although bear in mind that everyone has their own approach and some videos may contradict each other.

2. Make sure your first effort is small or in a location where results don't matter as much (basement, garage, etc). Your first few times doing taping/mudding are where you will do most of the learning.

3. What is underneath matters a lot. If you're doing a remodel or new project from scratch, make sure you've done your drywall related research first. That "good enough" framing job could end up being an absolute nightmare to drywall.

4. Measure twice, cut once. Just like in carpentry, only more so. Plan your layout on paper or chalked/pencilled on the studs before you get started.

5. Fixing a small hole might be best addressed by a bigger hole. Depends on location, etc, but if your first time looking at drywall is when you've "got a hole in my drywall I need to fix", there's a good chance that the best way to have it looking nice is to cut a regular shaped section out and screw it in place before going for the mud, tape, etc. (maybe this could have it's own post below, I suspect a lot of google searches want this part answered).
holes the size of a quarter can be patched fairly easy? as well as gashes say an inch wide,length?

when patching these, drywall tape is 2 inches wide but 250 feet long. for holes and gashes, use freshly opened mud, unmixed or thinned down, with 6" knife coat heavily forcing mud deep into hole/dash force completely through drywall so it's hanging on inside wall like plaster. when it dries this will keep from falling out. put tape over hole as soon as you can, 6"knife without pushing all mud through wall but allowing tape to be held till dry at least 24 hours. as drying, the tape will be sucked into the wall allowing you to second and third coat with the widest knife or trowel you can find? put a slight bend in trowel or knife to form an arch in the mud as you put it over the tape. remember the knife is arched. so the flatter you go over the tape the more it will cover and feather out to edges. practice first in areas that can be clean and washed off completely.

hold knife close to on edge as you approach tape, bringing more flat going over tape allowing tape to be buried deeper under mud. it may take more than 3 coats? but you can get it so nobody will notice it's there unless they knew it was before!

just my thoughts and experience

good luck
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:52 AM   #5
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
I will start out by bringing you the good news that you no longer have to worry too much what a "Butt Joint" is.

Butt joints used to be the bane of drywall finishers. No longer.

The introduction of a very inexpensive product called a "Butt Board" totally eliminates the need to fight with the heretofor dreaded bump caused by the butt joint standard hanging leaves you to deal with.

You can research and learn about butt boards, but for now, just be happy that they were invented.
These things are fantastic.
And for patching the big box stores now carry patches that are a piece of thin aluminum with a fiberglass mesh over it. It comes 4"x4" 6"x6" and 8"x8" and they are sticky on the back so no screws just stick them on the wall and cover with joint compound very DIY friendly.
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:00 AM   #6
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


Remember when you are cutting your drywall you don't want it to fit super tight cut it about 1/4" short that will leave about 1/8" all the way around.
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:06 AM   #7
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


When you open a bucket of drywall mud and don't use it all it can go bad and sour to stop this cover what mud is in the bucket with a little water and add a capful of bleach and seal. When ready to use pour off the water and bleach then stir.
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Old 01-12-2013, 02:22 PM   #8
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Great tip to save my unused mud!
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Old 01-14-2013, 12:06 AM   #9
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i'm not a pro, but i've put a piece of plastic bag (cut round) over the mud and a couple of times have dug into the mud a year or two later; it is not dried at all. i also drop in a tad of water before i drop in the plastic, just for kicks.
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Old 01-15-2013, 11:29 AM   #10
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


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i'm not a pro, but i've put a piece of plastic bag (cut round) over the mud and a couple of times have dug into the mud a year or two later; it is not dried at all. i also drop in a tad of water before i drop in the plastic, just for kicks.
I have always used the piece of plastic that comes in the tub already. it can be a little squirrely getting it centered, but make sure there are no air pockets and you are good to go
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Old 01-15-2013, 02:25 PM   #11
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Drywall FAQ - Common Questions Answered, + Tips and Tricks!


The only trouble with the plastic is when the bucket is open air gets in, then when you seal it back up the bacteria in the air grows for lack of a better term and this is what makes the mud sour or go bad. The bleach kills the bacteria. The plastic will work but you must be sure to get all the mud covered. The plastic that comes in the bucket is more to keep it from drying out. One thing a lot of people don't do is wipe the inside walls of the bucket down with a wet cloth or brush. If you ever notice when you open a used bucket of mud there is usually water on top so this also keeps a wet enviroment whice promotes bacteria growth.
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Old 01-15-2013, 03:26 PM   #12
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tool: ahha! that is what the bleach is for, huh? ok. got it. i will add some henceforth. yes, one needs to wipe the bucket clean or you get all kinds of grit in the mud, making streaks when you finish; i hate those little muthas!
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:44 PM   #13
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When hanging drywall never use a tapered edge on an outside corner, because when you put on the corner bead and try to mud it is a nightmare.
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Old 03-21-2013, 06:38 PM   #14
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Tool: It would seem you could span the taper, resting the knife on the thick part of the 'rock and spanning to corner bead, and fill 'er right up. Not so? Too much fussing?
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Old 03-21-2013, 07:11 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
I will start out by bringing you the good news that you no longer have to worry too much what a "Butt Joint" is.

Butt joints used to be the bane of drywall finishers. No longer.

The introduction of a very inexpensive product called a "Butt Board" totally eliminates the need to fight with the heretofor dreaded bump caused by the butt joint standard hanging leaves you to deal with.

You can research and learn about butt boards, but for now, just be happy that they were invented.
Butt Boards are a must!

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