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-   -   Drywall 4x8 or 4x12? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/drywall-4x8-4x12-22384/)

SnowUtopia 06-17-2008 08:03 AM

Drywall 4x8 or 4x12?
 
I'm going to drywall my basement and would it be more beneficial to use 4x12 sheets of drywall or 4x8 sheets? Thanks everyone

rjniles 06-17-2008 08:07 AM

Usually 4 by 12 sheet are better because you will have less butt joints to tape, but it depends on the shape of the room. But consider 4 by 12 will be harder (or impossible ) to get into a basement.

SnowUtopia 06-17-2008 08:09 AM

That's exactly what I was thinking too - 4x12's would be better and more cost effective for the compound and joints but pretty hard to work with and get around in a basement.

AtlanticWBConst. 06-17-2008 08:51 AM

The big question is: Do you have a walk-out basement or a basement that you will have to access from a bulkhead.

Generally, the pros will use 4x12 sheets to reduce the number of seams. However, for a newbi, such sized sheets can be difficult to handle, due to their size and weight. As stated, the other concern is access to the basement.

Walkout: You can get 4x12's in
Bulkhead: 4x10's will just squeeze in.
Other (smaller access points):4x8's will be the size to get.

SnowUtopia 06-17-2008 08:53 AM

Atlantic - thank you very much. I have a walk out basement so I could bring the 4x12's in through the door. I will have someone helping me hanging so I might just go with the 4x12's. Thanks.

AtlanticWBConst. 06-17-2008 09:20 AM

FWIW: 4x12' onto walls is not that difficult.
4x12's to attach to the ceiling done manually (without a lift, or other supports) is a world of pain for a newbi. They are extremely heavy, and most people, unless they work out with weights on a regualr basis, have great difficulty holding such weight over their heads, arms extended, for various lengths of time.

comp1911 06-17-2008 10:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 131100)
FWIW: 4x12' onto walls is not that difficult.
4x12's to attach to the ceiling done manually (without a lift, or other supports) is a world of pain for a newbi. They are extremely heavy, and most people, unless they work out with weights on a regualr basis, have great difficulty holding such weight over their heads, arms extended, for various lengths of time.

T-bar :thumbup:

RippySkippy 06-17-2008 12:22 PM

drywall lift! :thumbup: :thumbup:

Don't know where your at...but around here you can rent one for around $40 per weekend, and they break down to fit into a car. Best money spent...makes hanging DW almost easy. By myself I DW'd a 9' high ceiling in my garage with 4x12x5/8" fire rated. It was all I could do to load a single sheet...I couldn't of done it any other way. The pro drywallers wouldn't be caught dead with one...but that's why they're the pro and I'm not.

comp1911 06-17-2008 12:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RippySkippy (Post 131145)
drywall lift! :thumbup: :thumbup:

Don't know where your at...but around here you can rent one for around $40 per weekend, and they break down to fit into a car. Best money spent...makes hanging DW almost easy. By myself I DW'd a 9' high ceiling in my garage with 4x8x5/8" fire rated. It was all I could do to load a single sheet...I couldn't of done it any other way. The pro drywallers wouldn't be caught dead with one...but that's why they're the pro and I'm not.

:eek:

:thumbup:


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