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-   -   Dry wall vs drop ceiling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/dry-wall-vs-drop-ceiling-178294/)

grkaras 04-28-2013 03:13 PM

Dry wall vs drop ceiling
 
We have an uneven basement ceiling. Can a drop ceiling even be done? Or is dry wall the way to go since its not all one level?

Msradell 04-28-2013 04:49 PM

It depends on what you mean by uneven, but if it's because you have ducts, beams, or whatever crossing the area is not a big problem at all to use a drop ceiling. It can basically be done anywhere you can put sheetrock. The major advantage of using a drop ceiling is that you can remove a piece to access plumbing and electrical equipment. That obviously is difficult/impossible with sheetrock.

user1007 04-28-2013 04:49 PM

Unless you are leaving something out, you should be able to do a drop, tray, etc. ceiling with either drywall or acoustical tile so long as you are within code as far as height at the lowest point of the ceiling.

I assume your floor is level.

grkaras 04-28-2013 05:22 PM

Yes the floor is level. We have a spot where the vent had to be taken below a beam so the ceiling would have to be dropped farther in that area. Other than that it's all level.

SquishyBall 04-29-2013 01:36 PM

Either one.

Drywall will get you maximum height. If your unevenness is only 1/8" here and there, get a pack of drywall shims to bring your joists to level. Test across each few joists w a 4' level to see which ones are shy.

Drop is good if you need to access what's above them. But you lose a few inches in height.

Here's how one of our ceilings looks after drywalling around obstacles...
-mike

http://www.sims-family.net/diychatroom/ceiling.jpg

grkaras 04-29-2013 02:08 PM

1 Attachment(s)
This is a bad picture but look at the top. The vent was place below the beam not above so we lost a good foot or two. Drywall is probably best but more expensive and more time :/ also on the other side that you can't see it slopes. So it isn't just a 90 degree angle on that side it is more like a gradual height adjustment like this /

ToolSeeker 04-29-2013 08:35 PM

What you will have to do for the slope is build the framing out farther till it is square. If I'm not mistaken (possible) a drop ceiling needs a minimum of 2" of drop.


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