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Mstrlucky74 03-03-2013 06:00 PM

Demo Day
 
2 Attachment(s)
Planned on rocking over the existing sheet rock but one thing to another and we took it all down. I have two questions. Is there a preference as to what thickness sheet rock is better to put up. Also, all those nails in the rafters that you see in the pic.....should they be hammered in or removed. Don't want there to be problems when the new rock goes up. THanks.

joecaption 03-03-2013 06:10 PM

Far faster to just hammer them in.
I personaly prefer to use 5/8 on the ceiling and 1/2 on the walls.
Want to make it far easyer, rent, borrow, buy a drywall lift to do the ceiling.
Only use 1-1/4 drywall screws no nails.
While the walls and ceiling are open use expanding foam to seal all the areas where wiring of plumbing was run!.

Mstrlucky74 03-03-2013 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1129220)
Far faster to just hammer them in.
I personaly prefer to use 5/8 on the ceiling and 1/2 on the walls.
Want to make it far easyer, rent, borrow, buy a drywall lift to do the ceiling.
Only use 1-1/4 drywall screws no nails.
While the walls and ceiling are open use expanding foam to seal all the areas where wiring of plumbing was run!.

Thought that if they were hammered in it might compromise the sheetrock being flush to the rafters. Thanks Joe

joecaption 03-03-2013 08:23 PM

I see none of the insulation was stapled.
Really need to get it stapled before covering it up.

funfool 03-03-2013 08:55 PM

may take a little longer to remove the nails.
Start at the top and use a flat bar.. Takes one pull and nail drops to the floor and move to the next one down ... you can strip all the nails almost as fast as driving them in.


If you drive them in, will be the time you are struggling to hold the board in place, down to the last two nails in your mouth. drop one and the last one hits a head of a nail that was left in the wall and bends,

I pull as many as I can, if the head breaks off and does not pull, just drive it in.

Mstrlucky74 03-04-2013 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1129323)
I see none of the insulation was stapled.
Really need to get it stapled before covering it up.

Staple to what, the rafters?

joecaption 03-04-2013 09:55 AM

Sides of the rafters.

Maintenance 6 03-05-2013 02:26 PM

To be done right, the paper should be unfolded and stapled to the faces of the studs. I pull the nails. Probably nothing on god's earth ticks me off worse than hitting an old nail when I'm screwing drywall.

brucem609 03-05-2013 08:39 PM

Remove the old nails FOR CERTAIN, also fix the insulation prior to rocking up. Would not hurt to possibly install a vapor barrier if need be.

drywallfinisher 03-06-2013 10:46 AM

it's all overkill, I'd have the wall hung and screwed off by the time you guys were even ready to hang it. I really would like to break down the math in possibly hitting a nail thats been driven in as to pulled out. 10 nails per stud X the # of studs and perimeter.
Run your drywall hammer, knock the things in, and double check, and then go.

joecaption 03-06-2013 11:51 AM

http://www.owenscorning.com/around/i...Insulating.pdf

Page 14, section #3.
It's stapled inside the joist bay not to the face!

Maintenance 6 03-06-2013 04:29 PM

Nice guide. Now check out page 16 procedure #1 which says:

The flange on the facing can be
stapled to the inside or face of
the stud.


Unfolding the facer and stapling to the face of the stud does two things. It eliminates the little triangular shaped air path, two per stud that run top to bottom and makes the kraft facer into a single piece for better airsealing.

Gary in WA 03-06-2013 08:54 PM

I think the picture is a ceiling.... you want the paper flanges left folded just as the are. Any gaps in the paper= vapor retarders are area weighed, not acting as an air-barrier, but against vapor. IMO, pull the nails for less disruption of the thousands of fiberglass microscopic slivers that will fall when hammering and spread all around the house.

The chases the flanges create in a wall application do help with convective loops for up to 50% reduction, pp 48; http://www.buildingscienceconsulting...Measure_Up.pdf

BUT, in a wall or ceiling, leave them be, do not fold them over the stud edges or lose the drywall warranty; "4.2.1 Insulation batts and blankets or the flanges of insulation batts and blankets shall not be applied to the face of framing members to which gypsum panel products are to be attached." From; http://www.lafarge-na.com/GA-216-07_English.pdf

The drywall is required by code to be installed per manufacturers directions as is the insulation; and they don't require them stapled- per manufacturer: https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...9yRrrdP1VBztDg

Gary


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