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Old 08-04-2011, 02:11 PM   #1
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Damaged dry wall for wall papering?


I peeled off the old wall paper to find another layer of wall paper and paint underneath it, I started scraping and peeled off the dry wall down to the brown paper underneath that. How do I prepare the wall for wall papering now?

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Old 08-07-2011, 11:18 PM   #2
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Damaged dry wall for wall papering?


If it looks like damaged cardboard, then you likely removed the top paper layer from the drywall. You have damaged the wall. I *Believe* you can use GUARDZ to seal that in, then skim/spot repair with spackle compound, then prime the wall. However, I would get a 2nd opinion about the GUARDZ on the brown paper.

-K

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Old 08-14-2011, 11:18 PM   #3
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Damaged dry wall for wall papering?


Float a coat of joint compound. Not an easty route and needs a little prep first. I presume the brown paper has small loose pieces I call "fish scales" or "feathers". These small loose layers of paper must be addressed prior to applying compound layers and/wall paper (assuming you want a nice finish).

Try a small area first 2x2 or so. Use 80 grit sand paper to lightly sand the feathers. Once you've broken through them stop then go to 150grit and sand lightly again until fuzzy. Dont be to fussy it wont get smooth this way. Apply a thin layer of spackle over the area; let dry, sand. You will find bubbled or lifted areas in the smooth spackle. 80 grit these again and or cut bigger bubbles open with knife. Dont be afraid to sand to the paper again. Apply mud to the individual areas as needed or all over if its easier. Let dry. Float a 1/8" layer of joint compound over the area. Let dry. Sand with 150 and float a very thin layer spackle. sand and prime.

Assuming you've just done a beautiful job and you are thoroughly satisfied and psyched to move on the the next level, you are ready for the big time and some production methods to make this faster. Get one of those "stucco rollers" or "texture rollers" from the paint department. They are like paint rollers but look like magnified velcro loops. You need a clean 5 gal bucket and another with 4 gal water, 9" paint roller frame, big heavy duty variable speed electric drill with power mud mixer blade (you can sub this with a big "potato masher" mixer, availble in drywall tool section, and a wopping amount of back and arm strength), 10" spackle knife and pan or hawk, at leaste a 5 gal can of light weight joint compond and a big helping of steadfast, gritty, stubborn determination (you already have that or you wouldnt even think about DIY projects).

By adding water and spackle in the empty bucket mix the compound to a very thin consistency like melted ice cream (you can also mix in the full new mud bucket but be careful). Start by premixing new mud without adding water to loosen it, then add a quart of water to 5 gal; add 4 to 8 oz at a time thereafter.

Put the roller cover onto the frame and dip it right into the thin mud covering the roller completely. Roll this mud onto the wall evenly forming large stippled point pattern about 1/2" thick. Take your time and apply strength here. Wait a while let it set about 10 to 20 minutes at 70degrees and moderate humidity. Using the 10" blade apply the tool to the stipple at a very flat aspect so as to smooth the mud not remove it. Flatten the stipple everywhere but dont expect smooth the first time. Let dry. Use the above sand/scrape/cut methods to obtain disired finish. Apply re-coats using roller with yet thinner mud in thinner layers BUT!!! this time apply the 10"knife blade in a more perpendicular aspect to plow off the mud leaving only enough to fill in the scrapes, low spots and scratches. Repeat as needed and apply mud with knife as needed to. Use the water bucket to keep the tools clean during andf after applications.

Be advised the roller method will make a mess on you and the floor so use tarps and eye and hair protection. Use plenty of light and clean up while the mud is still wet.

Good work!
Max

Last edited by maxsmoothwall; 08-14-2011 at 11:25 PM.
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Old 08-15-2011, 04:17 AM   #4
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Damaged dry wall for wall papering?


Quote:
Originally Posted by maxsmoothwall View Post
Float a coat of joint compound. Not an easty route and needs a little prep first. I presume the brown paper has small loose pieces I call "fish scales" or "feathers". These small loose layers of paper must be addressed prior to applying compound layers and/wall paper (assuming you want a nice finish).

Try a small area first 2x2 or so. Use 80 grit sand paper to lightly sand the feathers. Once you've broken through them stop then go to 150grit and sand lightly again until fuzzy. Dont be to fussy it wont get smooth this way. Apply a thin layer of spackle over the area; let dry, sand. You will find bubbled or lifted areas in the smooth spackle. 80 grit these again and or cut bigger bubbles open with knife. Dont be afraid to sand to the paper again. Apply mud to the individual areas as needed or all over if its easier. Let dry. Float a 1/8" layer of joint compound over the area. Let dry. Sand with 150 and float a very thin layer spackle. sand and prime.

Assuming you've just done a beautiful job and you are thoroughly satisfied and psyched to move on the the next level, you are ready for the big time and some production methods to make this faster. Get one of those "stucco rollers" or "texture rollers" from the paint department. They are like paint rollers but look like magnified velcro loops. You need a clean 5 gal bucket and another with 4 gal water, 9" paint roller frame, big heavy duty variable speed electric drill with power mud mixer blade (you can sub this with a big "potato masher" mixer, availble in drywall tool section, and a wopping amount of back and arm strength), 10" spackle knife and pan or hawk, at leaste a 5 gal can of light weight joint compond and a big helping of steadfast, gritty, stubborn determination (you already have that or you wouldnt even think about DIY projects).

By adding water and spackle in the empty bucket mix the compound to a very thin consistency like melted ice cream (you can also mix in the full new mud bucket but be careful). Start by premixing new mud without adding water to loosen it, then add a quart of water to 5 gal; add 4 to 8 oz at a time thereafter.

Put the roller cover onto the frame and dip it right into the thin mud covering the roller completely. Roll this mud onto the wall evenly forming large stippled point pattern about 1/2" thick. Take your time and apply strength here. Wait a while let it set about 10 to 20 minutes at 70degrees and moderate humidity. Using the 10" blade apply the tool to the stipple at a very flat aspect so as to smooth the mud not remove it. Flatten the stipple everywhere but dont expect smooth the first time. Let dry. Use the above sand/scrape/cut methods to obtain disired finish. Apply re-coats using roller with yet thinner mud in thinner layers BUT!!! this time apply the 10"knife blade in a more perpendicular aspect to plow off the mud leaving only enough to fill in the scrapes, low spots and scratches. Repeat as needed and apply mud with knife as needed to. Use the water bucket to keep the tools clean during andf after applications.

Be advised the roller method will make a mess on you and the floor so use tarps and eye and hair protection. Use plenty of light and clean up while the mud is still wet.

Good work!
Max
All that is well and good but you NEED to apply the Gardz FIRST. This is what it is made for
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Old 08-15-2011, 09:42 PM   #5
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Damaged dry wall for wall papering?


We already placed joint compound to damaged sheetrock/ brown paper part and it is bubbled. We did texturing technique,also. I s there anyway to repair this or should we just replace the sheetrock and start over.

Thank you, Gisele

My husband is sanding it right now and it seems like the bubbles are disappearing. Is it ok to prime and then paint?

Last edited by auntgigi1; 08-15-2011 at 09:57 PM.
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Old 08-16-2011, 04:25 AM   #6
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Damaged dry wall for wall papering?


You still need the Gardz, prime with it, skim again if needed, sand,clean the dust, prime and paper. Gardz is a good wallcovering primer.

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