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-   -   cutting drywall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/cutting-drywall-33387/)

handifoot 12-08-2008 10:18 AM

cutting drywall
 
Has anyone used any of the electrical box marking systems for cutting out drywall? Seems like they could save an amature like me a lot of time and measuring. HD sells one called blind mark, any good? BTW, I have recently purchased a dremmel that I think can help with this task.

Marvin Gardens 12-08-2008 10:48 AM

I just get the retro box and cut the hole using that as a template.

Be careful using any kind of power tools when doing this. They can get away from you real fast and a simple install can lead to lots of sheetrock patching.

And oversized covers really look ugly to me.

rgsgww 12-08-2008 11:25 AM

I use a dremel for the paint, don't want to chip that! Then I just use a hand drywall saw to cut. If you just use the drywall saw, you might pull paint off.

I use a laser leveling device to be sure its even.

Stubbie 12-08-2008 01:06 PM

Hang the drywall over the box then use a cutout tool like a rotozip. Simply pop it through the drywall close to the box move over till you hit the outside edge then move around the box in the direction that the torque pushes into the box. Make sure all your wiring is tucked inside the box of course. You then just patch the short cut in the drywall with mud when finishing.

220/221 12-08-2008 01:35 PM

Or find the inside of the box first then pull the rotozip out and re enter exactly on the outside. No patch/fill this way, just an occaisional wire scuff.

AtlanticWBConst. 12-08-2008 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stubbie (Post 195588)
Hang the drywall over the box then use a cutout tool like a rotozip. Simply pop it through the drywall close to the box move over till you hit the outside edge then move around the box in the direction that the torque pushes into the box. Make sure all your wiring is tucked inside the box of course. You then just patch the short cut in the drywall with mud when finishing.

Quote:

Originally Posted by 220/221 (Post 195602)
Or find the inside of the box first then pull the rotozip out and re enter exactly on the outside. No patch/fill this way, just an occaisional wire scuff.

Common, you guys should know enough about this. It's not that easy.

In fact, rookie drywallers take about 100 to 200 sheets of sheetrock before they even start to get the hang of it (using a router/rotozip without butchering the area), besides all the cut up wiring they do, before they learn how to do it right....

A DIYer is better off marking the sheet and carefully cutting the boxes out manually, or prior to installing the sheet on the wall (on their smaller projects).

jerryh3 12-08-2008 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 195659)
Common, you guys should know enough about this. It's not that easy.

In fact, rookie drywallers take about 100 to 200 sheets of sheetrock before they even start to get the hang of it (using a router/rotozip without butchering the area), besides all the cut up wiring they do, before they learn how to do it right....

A DIYer is better off marking the sheet and carefully cutting the boxes out manually, or prior to installing the sheet on the wall (on their smaller projects).

Agreed. An amateur with a rotozip can do a lot of damage. Get a good keyhole saw and razor knife and learn how to cut boxes by hand.

theatretch85 12-08-2008 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rgsgww (Post 195521)
I use a dremel for the paint, don't want to chip that! Then I just use a hand drywall saw to cut. If you just use the drywall saw, you might pull paint off.

I use a laser leveling device to be sure its even.

I've never had paint chip with a drywall saw when cutting holes for boxes, and so long as your keeping the hole cut-out small any paint chipping would be covered by the wall plate.

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryh3 (Post 195678)
Agreed. An amateur with a rotozip can do a lot of damage. Get a good keyhole saw and razor knife and learn how to cut boxes by hand.

I fully agree!

BTW to the OP, I have seen articles and reviews on the BlindMark, never actually used it myself but it looks like it has the potential to save you some time. Though I suspect it will take some getting used to just to get the holes right. The box protrudes from the stud face at least a 1/2" (should anyway) so the drywall won't be flush up against the studs until you cut the hole for the boxes; could be kinda tricky for a novice.

Stubbie 12-09-2008 11:21 AM

I'm sorry for giving the guy some choices to try please excuse my ignorance. 100 to 200 sheets to get it right...maybe you should tell the apprentice to open his eyes....:)

jerryh3 12-09-2008 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stubbie (Post 196002)
I'm sorry for giving the guy some choices to try please excuse my ignorance. 100 to 200 sheets to get it right...maybe you should tell the apprentice to open his eyes....:)

Did mean anything negative by it. A rotozip is a great tool. But there is a learning curve. If the OP is going to do a lot of new drywall, learning to use one might be beneficial. Start in bedrooms or closets where the cuts won't been seen.

Stubbie 12-09-2008 11:44 AM

Assuming the guy uses a fairly new cutout tool it really isn't that hard if he uses his depth gauge. They are vastly improved over the older models. As you gain skill you remove it. Measuring and cutting holes is also a skill in itself to get the hole where it does not require patching and can result in many wasted sheets. I'd take my chances with a cut out tool any day novice or not. Patching....you guys sound like that is a cardinal sin...I guarantee a novice will need to patch just as much and patching will be more severe trying to measure out the box or ceiling location prior to hanging the sheet. Most drywallers use a combination of both depending on the situation. A cutout tool is simply a slit in the drywall if you error. A hole cut wrong or off by 1/4 inch or more requires a major repair to fill the gap or recutting a new sheet.

jerryh3 12-09-2008 11:51 AM

Good points. As to the keyhole saw, I was referring to cutting the box after the sheet is tacked in place.

Stubbie 12-09-2008 12:29 PM

That's a good way to do it...we are simply giving the guy some options.

handifoot 12-10-2008 06:44 PM

Jeepers guys, I didn't think I'd stir up such a controversy here. :blink: I appreciate all of the advice given. Tell you what I'm gonna do, I have a lot of drywall scraps and I'm going to do a few mock ups with 2x4's and boxes to try to get "the feel ". Wish me luck

drewhart 12-10-2008 09:50 PM

i am a diyer. idid this the rotozip way. i messed up two holes before i got the hang of it. then i did about twenty good after. i sugest you get the rotozip.


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