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-   -   Cutting a doorway into existing wall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/cutting-doorway-into-existing-wall-168208/)

Myst420 01-04-2013 07:52 AM

Cutting a doorway into existing wall
 
Hey everyone,

A friend asked if I could help her out with a project she has, but I have a few questions...


Basically, she needs to cut a doorway (no door) into an existing wall (interior). One side goes into a large open area, and the other side would go into a hallway for access to a bathroom. I've done basic drywall stuff before, but nothing quite like this.

Would it just be to cut the drywall out first, then cut any studs (based on the only pics I have, I'm assuming they aren't load-bearing), and then this is where i have questions....

I would think I would have to frame this somehow, or am I wrong on this?

Any help would be great.

Here are the couple pics that I have.

The opening would be cut where the unpainted section is:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-N...2C718_071356A0

This is a pic taken from in the hallway on the other side:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-1...2C411_C4E8A698

Thanks,
Mike

joecaption 01-04-2013 10:00 AM

Is this a concrete block wall?
If so not a great first time DIY job and your just going to have the tools to do it.
If it is block I'd be contacting a real mason or a concrete cutting company. (yes there's companys that all they do)
http://www.doityourself.com/stry/how...ock-foundation

ToolSeeker 01-04-2013 10:19 AM

I don't think it's concrete since it's an interior wall and he's said cut out studs. First you must be sure about load bearing that makes a very big difference. And yes it has to be cut out then re framed to rough opening specs and since you have cut out the studs you need to add a header above the opening. You also need to knock a hole and make sure there is no sparky or plumbing where you want the door. Doable but not an easy job.

DannyT 01-04-2013 10:32 AM

looks like 15 or 16 foot ceilings so it's prob a commercial building and would likely have metal stud walls.
shouldn't be much trouble at all

jeffnc 01-04-2013 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1085950)
Is this a concrete block wall?

That's what I thought too. On closer inspection, I think the confusing thing is that it's drywall, installed incorrectly. It has 4 corners that meet - can you see that in the photo above the (proposed) door and to the left? Are these 12' drywall sheets installed vertically?

Are these metal studs?

Myst420 01-04-2013 10:47 AM

Thanks for the reply guys...

I haven't actually seen this wall in person yet, but I know its not a concrete wall.

Danny, it is a commercial building, but I couldn't tell you for sure yet if it has metal studs. I've never worked with metal studs. If that's what it has, how would I frame it?

joecaption 01-04-2013 10:49 AM

I was looking at that first picture.
Not sure why it would be block at the top of the wall and something else under it.

jeffnc 01-04-2013 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1086010)
I was looking at that first picture.

Yeah, look above where they want to put the door - you see 4 white lines meet. That looks like drywall installed incorrectly (not offsetting the seams), don't you think?

Myst420 01-04-2013 10:58 AM

I think the drywall was up before they got into the place, so who knows who installed it, but they have told me that the wall definitely isn't block. They had originally hired someone to do this, but that person ended up doing one part of their job and is now MIA. That's why she asked if I could help.

jeffnc 01-04-2013 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Myst420 (Post 1086019)
I think the drywall was up before they got into the place, so who knows who installed it, but they have told me that the wall definitely isn't block. They had originally hired someone to do this, but that person ended up doing one part of their job and is now MIA.

I wasn't looking to place blame Myst. The only thing is that since it's not how drywall is normally installed, it didn't look like drywall at first.

Assuming it's drywall, and assuming it's metal studs, you can find how to install a doorframe into it. You just have to use metal stud framing and techniques rather than wood framing (e.g. metal screws instead of wood, metal saw blades instead of wood). You'll need to cut out a larger drywall section than the size of the door, then drywall back over it. It looks something like this.

http://www.diyadvice.com/diy/doors-w...h-metal-studs/

Myst420 01-04-2013 11:11 AM

No worries Jeff.

They aren't wanting to put an actual door in, just a walkway, but the framing process would be basically the same, right?

jeffnc 01-04-2013 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Myst420 (Post 1086029)
No worries Jeff.

They aren't wanting to put an actual door in, just a walkway, but the framing process would be basically the same, right?

Yes. If there is electrical wire in the wall there it will have to be rerouted to go over the top of the opening of course. If you do so, please use plastic grommets after you cut holes in the studs, to protect the wire from chaffing.

ToolSeeker 01-04-2013 12:07 PM

The drywall may not be installed incorrectly, a lot of commercial building are sheet rocked vertically instead of horizontally and it looks in the pic like about 4' between the seams. If this is true you may only have 1 stud to deal with.

Myst420 01-04-2013 12:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1086090)
The drywall may not be installed incorrectly, a lot of commercial building are sheet rocked vertically instead of horizontally and it looks in the pic like about 4' between the seams. If this is true you may only have 1 stud to deal with.

If that's the case, that would make my life easier :thumbsup:

jeffnc 01-04-2013 12:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1086090)
The drywall may not be installed incorrectly, a lot of commercial building are sheet rocked vertically instead of horizontally and it looks in the pic like about 4' between the seams. If this is true you may only have 1 stud to deal with.

It's not the verticality or distance between seams, it's the 4 corners coming together at one point.


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