Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Drywall & Plaster

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-29-2011, 07:15 PM   #16
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Oh-Fudge View Post
Wow, seems to be a variety of opinions. This last project I used a straight knife for the corners and have to admit it looks better than using the corner knife. BUT, and a big but, doing one side at a time and waiting for each to dry before doing the other side, after 3 coats, is a royal PIA and waste of valuable time. I am taping the inside of a new 2'x3' closet and the close quarters make it hard to use the corner tool.

I can't believe in this day and age someone hasn't invented a better way to hang drywall. How about drywall tongue-and-groove? Or drywall caulk crack filler? Or roll-on seemless drywall (like rain gutters)?
There actually IS now a better way for part of the process. It's called "Butt Boarding".

__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 08:27 AM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 141
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


????butt boarding....do tell!
Marbledust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 09:37 AM   #18
A Little Of Everything
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 2,144
Rewards Points: 4
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbledust View Post
????butt boarding....do tell!
I hope that does not turn out to be a dangerous question to ask.
DrHicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 09:48 AM   #19
Military Mom of 4
 
Snav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 974
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


It's a method using a tool called a 'butt-taper' - which is an angled wedge wheel that presses an adhesive onto the board joint which is cut into a trapezoidal dip of sorts before hanging.

I think that's what he's referring to - if not - then you just learned something new.
__________________
At this present moment in time I am making cabinets for the kitchen - just in case you wanted to know what I'm doing when I'm not around.
Snav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 12:41 PM   #20
Is this wire Hot?
 
Oh-Fudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 177
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


hahahaha, cool. But that still involves playing with mud. I just want a method where you can just stick it up like panelling - a few nails and poof, you're done.

Here is a video of the "butt taper". I especially like how the guy in the first video is fake hitting the wall to show how strong it is at the end

http://www.butttaper.com/video.htm
Oh-Fudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 01:08 PM   #21
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snav View Post
It's a method using a tool called a 'butt-taper' - which is an angled wedge wheel that presses an adhesive onto the board joint which is cut into a trapezoidal dip of sorts before hanging.

I think that's what he's referring to - if not - then you just learned something new.
Well, "Yes" and "No". Mostly "No".

The Patented "Butt Taper" process involves buying an expensive roller tool. Butt Boards do not. (BTW, the Butt Taper tool does not cut the board at all... it just 'squishes' it down.)

The Patented "Butt Taper" process involves using water to soak and soften the edges of the drywall boards so that tool can 'squish' it. Butt Boards do not.

The Patented "Butt Taper" process involves extra steps of allowing the mud to dry before moving on to the next step. Butt Boards do not.

The Patented "Butt Taper" process, however, does not involve "pressing an adhesive onto the board joint"; and neither does Butt Boarding.

Butt Boarding DOES involve screwing in an extra plywood board similar to the way this step is shown in the Butt Taper video...... but using many less screws than shown in that video..... and with Butt Boarding, that is all you do differently from regular hanging and finishing.

The advantage to Butt Boarding over regular hanging is that you eliminate the need to try and 'feather out' the usual big bulge where the two butt ends of the boards meet.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 01:32 PM   #22
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Fudge,

If you have even a small bit of artistic flair in you, drywall finishing can be more than just fun; it can be very relaxing, therapeutic, and rewarding.

The trick is in learning that your intention is NOT to apply thick layers of mud to the walls. But rather to SPARINGLY and judiciously smooth on successive relatively thin layers of mud to eventually wind up with a built-up coat that completes and compliments the original smooth paper surface of the drywall boards.

You are not a pro trying to hustle the job to take home a fatter paycheck. You do not have to (and should not try to) emulate what you see them doing. You can, and should, relax and simply accept the fact that your drywall finishing job is going to take you a day or two longer than it would take a pro. So what? Do you know anyone who can match the speed of a pro at ANY job they have never done before?

Of course not! But you CAN come very close to duplicating the professional look of the finished job if you do little more than be careful, neat, and take your time.

And you will save a bundle of money!
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 01:58 PM   #23
Military Mom of 4
 
Snav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 974
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?




So I was wrong
__________________
At this present moment in time I am making cabinets for the kitchen - just in case you wanted to know what I'm doing when I'm not around.
Snav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2011, 03:11 PM   #24
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


No, not "wrong", merely a little short on reading about the product to be fully informed.

Fudge - There are a couple of basics that will make your d/w finishing a whole lot easier. Some of these suggestions will sound silly and almost dumb, but they are so easily overlooked that they do bear mentioning.

The first thing to learn is that d/w mud is not really "ready-to-use" right out of the bucket. Just like paint, it needs to be thinned down some. In the case of mud, it needs about a cup of water added to the 5 gallon bucket. And you have to mix it in real, real good. When using the mud for the base coat under the tape (use only PAPER tape, BTW), it needs to be even sloppier (wetter).

Secondly, don't fill the hand pan all the way up. It makes it heavy, and you will get tired easier. And it also does not give you the necessary room to wipe the knife (trowel) off.

Wiping the knife off often and repeatedly is important. Keep it clean.

Also, work with only a 1/2" wide (or thereabouts) strip of mud right along the edge of the knife. You don't want , or need, a whole knife full of mud.

The angle (tilt) of the knife will give you different results. Experiment with this.

A knife held almost perpendicular to the surface of the board will fill dips and grooves more evenly than one held at an almost 'laid-down' attitude.

Always remember that the knife is flexible. It bends and bows. Pressure with a finger applied to one side or the other of the knife blade will exert more pressure on that side, and less pressure on the other side. This is something to experiment with when desiring to feather the current knife pass with the one you just made previously. Put pressure on the wrong side of the knife, and you will invariably 'groove' the wet mud on the board from your last pass. You often want that side of the knife with the least pressure to 'float' across the wet mud already there. It helps the two passes blend together better.

Keep cleaning that knife off! After every pass or two.

And throw away ALL the mud in your pan after each use. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES GET CHEAP AND TRY TO SAVE MONEY BY PUTTING ANY MUD BACK INTO THE BUCKET. ALWAYS THROW IT AWAY!

If you hear nothing I've said here, listen well to that last bit of advice! The crap is dirt cheap, and old, drying mud can mess up your job beyond belief. (That's one reason I told you to keep cleaning, cleaning, and cleaning your knife.) In fact, if you see that too much dried, clumpy mud is collecting on the edge of your hand pan, take your fingers and scrape it off those edges and throw it away.

Same thing with the bucket. Keep it clean. Don't allow streaks and clumps of mud to remain on the inside edges of the bucket. The mud will dry there into hard lumps that will eventually fall into the good mud. Scrape it clean each and every time you use it.

There are a lot more tips, but these will start you on the road to happy finishing.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T

Last edited by Willie T; 09-30-2011 at 09:42 PM.
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Willie T For This Useful Post:
Oh-Fudge (10-04-2011)
Old 09-30-2011, 06:48 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: BC Canada
Posts: 500
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Oh-Fudge View Post

I can't believe in this day and age someone hasn't invented a better way to hang drywall. How about drywall tongue-and-groove? Or drywall caulk crack filler? Or roll-on seemless drywall (like rain gutters)?

Wasn't that long ago that drywall was the new, improved easy technology over plastering that is, which from what I gather is much more time/labour intensive, and needs a greater learning curve.

Maybe a plastic product, that clips in or something, will be the next desired wall finish material.
chrisBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2011, 10:18 AM   #26
Member
 
AGWhitehouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,378
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisBC View Post
Maybe a plastic product, that clips in or something, will be the next desired wall finish material.
That's called FRP...but I don't think anyone wants that in their living room...

There is always the options of beadboard paneling and the other available patterns. Just nail up and paint...but a smooth surface will include mud.
__________________
Life's too short...so enjoy it!
AGWhitehouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2011, 03:13 PM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: BC Canada
Posts: 500
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by AGWhitehouse View Post
That's called FRP...but I don't think anyone wants that in their living room...

There is always the options of beadboard paneling and the other available patterns. Just nail up and paint...but a smooth surface will include mud.

Yes, I'm familiar with this.. what I was thinking of was office wall systems.

My point is that to think outside of the box a bit, I doubt drywall will be around forever, some new technology will come up, it always does.

It just requires that you have to think outside of what you are familiar with presently.
chrisBC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2011, 04:32 PM   #28
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisBC View Post
Yes, I'm familiar with this.. what I was thinking of was office wall systems.

My point is that to think outside of the box a bit, I doubt drywall will be around forever, some new technology will come up, it always does.

It just requires that you have to think outside of what you are familiar with presently.
The sad thing about that is that usually the "new" technology is seldom as good as what it replaces. Just like drywall cannot hold a candle to the strength and quality of plaster.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2011, 04:52 PM   #29
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 229
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by DrHicks

That's pretty presumptuous.
Those are facts. I do this and so can anyone who really wants to.
OhioHomeDoctor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2011, 04:58 PM   #30
A Little Of Everything
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 2,144
Rewards Points: 4
Default

Corner Knives - Good? Bad?


Quote:
Originally Posted by OhioHomeDoctor View Post
Those are facts. I do this and so can anyone who really wants to.
You're wrongly assuming that your opinions are facts.

Let me show a couple things you wrote that are absolutely false:

"Corner trowels are for amateurs who do not care about quality."

"After your first corner you will be a better drywaller than a guy who uses a corner trowel for a lifetime."



Wrong and, well, wrong again...

DrHicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Hows and Whys of Furring Strips. Part-1 Willie T How To Guides 12 03-01-2013 02:58 PM
Blocking out studs on a 45 degree corner? J S Machine Remodeling 7 04-02-2010 09:55 AM
Bedroom ceiling corner water stain timcsi General DIY Discussions 3 11-10-2009 04:07 PM
Problem with kitchen corner maddie Remodeling 6 08-21-2009 06:58 AM
Mitering (sp?) a corner Bocolo Carpentry 4 05-04-2009 08:47 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.