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Old 03-10-2010, 12:46 AM   #1
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Ceiling corner bead


Just put up new drywall in our dining room. Do you usually install a corner bead in edges of the ceiling and wall? Or just use tape. I bought the plastic corner bead with the tape on the edges. Is there something else that is better? Just looking to do this the right way the first time. Thanks for your help.

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Old 03-10-2010, 06:10 AM   #2
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Ceiling corner bead


Regular paper is the standard----My guy likes to use the heavy reinforced roll on inside corners.

It's sold in 100 foot rolls for about $17.00--(Depot sorry I don't recall the brand )Not cheap but it will give you a very straight crisp edge,
Regular paper gets kind of wavy as you pass over seams and imperfections.

This might be a worth while expense for a novice.

Just a suggestion---Mike--

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Old 03-10-2010, 08:43 AM   #3
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Ceiling corner bead


Thanks Mike! $17 a roll, not a big deal to me if it makes things easier. Any other comments are welcomed.
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Old 03-10-2010, 05:55 PM   #4
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Ceiling corner bead


most novices don't understand the different muds--so here is a VERY brief explanation.

Dura Bond--bag mix--Chemical sets in 20-45 or 90 minutes--used to fill gaps and holes before taping.
Can also be used to set the paper--Very hard to sand.

Green top bucket--Used to set paper--loaded with glue--dries fairly quick --also hard to sand

Blue top bucket--Used for top coats--slow to dry--very easy to sand.

If you have a strong 1/2 inch drill and a mud mixer--whip the new buckets before starting.Adding a bit of water is sometimes desirable.

You also need knives--6--10--12 inch--the 6" is most difficult to find.You want a flexible but firm blade.

I get them two at a time from AAMES--That a drywall supply house near me. I have yet to find an acceptable tool in the box stores.

I'll answer any questions that I can for you. Experienced pros can get fine results with just about any mud---I've given you the muds that I believe you will be successful with.---MIKE---
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Old 03-11-2010, 07:34 AM   #5
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Ceiling corner bead


regular paper tape is normally used in the angles. The Sure Corner or Strait Flex types of reinforced tapes oh'mike is referring to are meant for "off angles" (kneewall angles for example) and outside corners that are not 90 degrees. You could use it, but not necessary unless your corners are very crooked. The corner bead you bought is for outside corners....
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Old 03-17-2010, 11:04 PM   #6
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Ceiling corner bead


Just to add to what was mentioned earlier about mud, there is another drying type, all purpose mud, Pro Form All Purpose drywall compound (black lid) that is suppose to be very high in adhesive strength, perhaps higher than the green lid mud. You should expect a good amount of shrinkage when using the drying type mud in either the green or black lid buckets. The lightweight blue lid mud won't shrink as much and, as mentioned, sands easier. The drying type compound packaged in cardboard containers is a buck or two cheaper and is the same mud you get in buckets. I keep a couple of clean buckets and lids handy and pour/squeeze the box mud into the buckets. Yea, a bit of extra work, but it makes for easier mixing if needed.
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Old 03-18-2010, 09:05 AM   #7
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Yeah, the box mud id a bit cheaper, but you don't get as much either. I think it's like 50lb. in a box and 62lb. to a bucket. Would be less waste though if it's you don't need it all and it's just going to sit around unused....
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Old 03-18-2010, 10:16 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjbatlanta View Post
Yeah, the box mud is a bit cheaper, but you don't get as much either. I think it's like 50lb. in a box and 62lb. to a bucket.


Yes, by weight a bucket of all purpose (green lid) mud is 61.7 pounds but, if you consider the volume of the material it is 4.5 gallons, same as a box of mud. You get just as much mud in a box as you do in a bucket.
Whether a bucket or a box, blue label lightweight mud is 4.5 gallons and both will weight 50 pounds, that's were the "light weight" enters the equation.
The monetary savings is in the packaging, not the product.
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Old 03-18-2010, 10:36 AM   #9
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Ceiling corner bead


I don't see the volume on the bucket (green lid), just weight. But I don't think the bucket weighs 11.7 pounds (the difference in weight between a box and a bucket). And a box of regular ready mix won't fill an empty ready mix bucket to the same level it was filled from the factory in my experience (years ago). Lightweight may be a different story. I personally don't use it and didn't even know it came in boxes, so I stand corrected on that point! I worked on a remodel for a lady who worked at a local "mud plant" that manufactures Ruco joint compound. I asked her about what the mud in a 5 gallon bucket actually cost to make. She wouldn't really say, but she said "the bucket costs more than what goes in it". And at the time (early '80s) a bucket was probably around $6.50, maybe a bit less.....

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