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-   -   Can I use 1/4" drywall on a ceiling? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/can-i-use-1-4-drywall-ceiling-57644/)

churchlady 11-20-2009 10:48 PM

Can I use 1/4" drywall on a ceiling?
 
I've got a very large cathedral ceiling area that needs to be drywalled. Those 1/2 sheets are pretty heavy... so is there a reason why I couldn't use 1/4" to make a miserable job like this a bit easier? I have to hire someone to do this so in theory it could cut down on the cost for labour too. Your thoughts?

Scuba_Dave 11-20-2009 10:54 PM

How far apart are the joists ?
1/2" is good up to 16" as I recall
not sure on 1/4"

churchlady 11-20-2009 11:29 PM

FYI Scuba D: They're 16" joists

jerryh3 11-21-2009 05:58 AM

Don't do it. If you're hiring a competent drywall person, 1/2" will not be a problem.

ccarlisle 11-21-2009 07:04 AM

From a labour cost point of view, it makes no difference. However, 1/4" will sag more and will show depressions etc more than stiffer drywall. Go with 1/2"...

Ron6519 11-21-2009 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by churchlady (Post 356009)
I've got a very large cathedral ceiling area that needs to be drywalled. Those 1/2 sheets are pretty heavy... so is there a reason why I couldn't use 1/4" to make a miserable job like this a bit easier? I have to hire someone to do this so in theory it could cut down on the cost for labour too. Your thoughts?

For a cathedral ceiling, you will want to use a drywall lift ,so weight should not be an issue. 1/4" drywall is only good to install over another solid base.
Ron

Maintenance 6 11-21-2009 08:09 PM

If this is for the church ceiling in your other posts, you definitely want 1/2". I think you planned on putting insulation above this as I recall. Depending on how much insulation you are loading above this, you may even want to think about using ceiling board, or jumping up to 5/8"

the carpenter 11-21-2009 08:54 PM

I think 1/2" ceiling board is REQUIRED if it is to be holding up insulation. If there is no insulation being held up, normal 1/2" is the way to go.

Bob Mariani 11-22-2009 06:24 AM

Use 1/2" at least. 1/4" is only used to cover over existing damaged surfaces or built up curved walls.

churchlady 11-23-2009 11:28 PM

Thanks for all the input you guys. I was hoping to get away with that 1/4" but it sounds like a bad idea now! Oh well.

PS Maintenance 6: What is "ceiling board"?... Maybe I've been living under a rock but I haven't heard of it.

SULTINI 11-24-2009 07:35 AM

Rent
 
CHURCHLADY

Rent a drywall lift then you don't have to worry about weight as much.

let the lift do the work.

Sorry did not read post #6 close enough, got to check glasses.

Maintenance 6 11-24-2009 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by churchlady (Post 357170)
Thanks for all the input you guys. I was hoping to get away with that 1/4" but it sounds like a bad idea now! Oh well.

PS Maintenance 6: What is "ceiling board"?... Maybe I've been living under a rock but I haven't heard of it.

Guess it wasn't a sheet"rock" you were living under. It is 1/2" thick drywall that is manufactured to allow higher loading, such as insulation, without sagging. It is lighter, of course, than 5/8", but will still allow you to place a substantial load of insulation per square foot.

295yards 11-25-2009 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 (Post 357337)
Guess it wasn't a sheet"rock" you were living under. It is 1/2" thick drywall that is manufactured to allow higher loading, such as insulation, without sagging. It is lighter, of course, than 5/8", but will still allow you to place a substantial load of insulation per square foot.

Learned something new!

I thought ceiling board was 5/8 drywall :laughing:


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