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-   -   bubble in tape (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/bubble-tape-187281/)

Fix'n it 09-19-2013 09:23 PM

bubble in tape
 
some of my taping, where the joint is, is swelled up. what could be causing this ?
durabond 90 and paper tape.

oh'mike 09-19-2013 10:21 PM

Wrong mud----

Multipurpose (green lid) contains glue and is the first choice for setting paper----with a rapid setting powder---you take a chance of poor bonding----

Cut away all loose paper and replace it----

ToolSeeker 09-20-2013 08:11 AM

Cut out the bubble and cover with mud. Bubbles are usually caused by not enough mud under the tape or if hot mud mixed to dry.

Gary in WA 09-20-2013 06:48 PM

Paper tape and setting compound is stronger, denser, better bonding and resists high humidity (think kit., bath, laundry) much better than a drying compound. Even used on Aqua-tough backer board, racquet-ball courts and other concrete applications; http://www.usg.com/sheetrock-durabon...-compound.html

http://www.usg.com/rc/installation-a...s-en-J1780.pdf

http://www.usg.com/rc/technical-arti...e-en-J1990.pdf

Just slit open the swelling, length-wise if possible, and add more to both sides, gently blade over to spread, then blade again to remove excess, top coat (thin) with that excess; Click on "Technical"; http://www.usg.com/sheetrock-durabon....html#tab-faqs

Gary

Fix'n it 09-21-2013 04:56 AM

i am using setting type.

Fix'n it 09-21-2013 05:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1244107)
Cut out the bubble and cover with mud. Bubbles are usually caused by not enough mud under the tape or if hot mud mixed to dry.

it could be i am not getting enough down. but its seems to be covering well, hell, idk.

i don't think i am making it too dry, as it lasts for a while in the bucket.

..................

thanx for the "fix" tips. will do.

ToolSeeker 09-21-2013 07:26 AM

This will probably start an argument BUT if you tear off the length of tape you need, put it in a bucket of water, pull it out run it between two fingers to remove the excess water. Then tape as you normally would you won't get bubbles in your tape.

Fix'n it 09-21-2013 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1244535)
This will probably start an argument BUT if you tear off the length of tape you need, put it in a bucket of water, pull it out run it between two fingers to remove the excess water. Then tape as you normally would you won't get bubbles in your tape.

interesting. i was thinking i could spray the joint with a water bottle, first.
but your idea is intriguing.

Fix'n it 09-21-2013 08:23 AM

i just when and wet a piece of tape. it didn't reduce its integrity.

the plot thickens.

Nailbags 09-21-2013 10:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1244535)
This will probably start an argument BUT if you tear off the length of tape you need, put it in a bucket of water, pull it out run it between two fingers to remove the excess water. Then tape as you normally would you won't get bubbles in your tape.

no your right it is no diffrent then putting tape in a slop box it is one way to do it with hot mud. But I think his main problem that I have found in using hot mud to dry when mixed. needs to be a consistsy (sp) of sour cream then you have it right any thicker and it is to dry. also if over mixed to much air in it and it will let the air cause bubbles too. Just use the ready made green lid. and wetting the tape I see no problem there at all.

jeffnc 09-21-2013 01:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fix'n it (Post 1244505)
i don't think i am making it too dry, as it lasts for a while in the bucket.

It doesn't really matter how long it lasts, because that has more to do with its setting time than its drying time.

Setting compound can work fine with paper tape (if you can get it to work, it is stronger as someone mentioned.) The 3 primary things you have to do are
1 - mud should be wet enough
2 - get enough mud as a first layer
3 - properly compress the paper tape into the mud

Wetting the tape can help as well, as mentioned. Since paper tape absorbs so much moisture, dry compound should be mixed a bit wetter than most amateurs mix it.

Once you have a bubble, cutting it out is the only thing to do.

Fix'n it 09-22-2013 09:08 AM

2 Attachment(s)
ok, i did the ceiling yesterday. i wet the tape and i mixed the mud wetter than i had been.

i have no bubbles. not even that, the tape has sucked up into the joint.

but boy, this stuff is so messy now.

i was told, last year, to not use the premix for taping. to start with durabond setting.
so that is what i am doing. i have the green and puck green premix to finish the joints.

new kitchen & dining room, in the works.

oh'mike 09-22-2013 09:32 AM

There are three kinds of mud commonly used in drywall work---

Powdered Easy Sand-------20-45-90 minute---white bag---used to pack gaps--can be used to set paper tape--but is not recommended---Very hard to sand---often used for first coat over the tape--good for packing corner bead--(Durrabond--brown bag--is used for exterior work and is hard a s rock)

Multipurpose---green lid----contains glue--used for setting paper---good for first coat over the paper---some pros use this for topping--but it is hard to sand--

Light weight---Blue lid-----topping compound--creamy consistency--easiest to sand--used for the final coat---This mud is to soft for any purpose other than topping.

jeffnc 09-22-2013 10:05 AM

Mike, I never felt Easy Sand or Multipurpose compounds are very difficult to sand (Durabond, yes.) They might be harder than Lightweight, but still very sandable for me.

But even so, I think the first coat (which can be done with Easy Sand) or even the second coat, don't need to be sanded much if at all, compared to the final coat. At least for the first coat, if you do it right you shouldn't need any sanding - at the very least, after it sets but while it's still damp, you can scrape down any ridges you left with a putty knife, and you're good for the next coat.

Easy Sand probably wouldn't be my favorite for sanding the final coat, but Multipurpose is just fine, I think.

jeffnc 09-22-2013 10:09 AM

Personally, while setting compound will withstand high humidity areas better, I don't really think kitchens or laundries are really any concern, once they are properly finished with paint. I use setting compound primarily in 3 situations:
- when I need speed (have to do 2 or 3 coats in 1 day)
- to patch an area that I think might crack
- for garages

Some baths might get humid enough for me to consider it there too. But in general, even though setting compound is tougher, I just don't think you need that toughness in most interior spaces. Multipurpose if installed correctly should be very adequate.


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