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-   -   blueboard + veneer plaster (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/blueboard-veneer-plaster-64665/)

Tonglebeak 02-16-2010 10:55 PM

blueboard + veneer plaster
 
I _was_ going to replace all of my drywall with new in my 103 year old house, but something caught my eye, and that was veneer plaster. It claims to be harder than drywall, and fairly cost effective.

However, it's backed by blueboard, which is simply drywall with a different paper on it, correct? Since plaster is applied to what is essentiallyi drywall, is the veneer plaster wall really that much harder (in terms of abuse resistance) than drywall? If so, how does it compare to true plaster walls (wood+plaster)?

pomelo 02-27-2010 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tonglebeak (Post 401339)
I _was_ going to replace all of my drywall with new in my 103 year old house, but something caught my eye, and that was veneer plaster. It claims to be harder than drywall, and fairly cost effective.

However, it's backed by blueboard, which is simply drywall with a different paper on it, correct? Since plaster is applied to what is essentiallyi drywall, is the veneer plaster wall really that much harder (in terms of abuse resistance) than drywall? If so, how does it compare to true plaster walls (wood+plaster)?

We use it a lot if Florida. It is a lot more durable that regular drywall. It costs a little more in material, but you save in finishing time. I don't see why you would need/want a stronger material for a wall. A plaster veneer wall can take a lot of abuse.

ccarlisle 02-28-2010 07:53 AM

Well, we came across this situation just last week where we were called upon to repair an overhead water leak in a 90-yr old house kitchen, where both the ceiling and the walls were the original lath-and-plaster. Now our protocol calls for - and the insurance company accepted - the replacement of "old" plaster (walls and ceiling) with old plaster methods - which meant blueboard+veneer plaster, not drywall. The traditional 'skimcoat/brown coat/finish coat over wooden lath method was rejected for cost reasons.

The difference in cost between blueboard+veneer and drywall wasn't all that significant when the customers preferences for the painting were taken into account - so it came down to whether or not the customer wanted the 'old' plaster look. They didn't care...

In the end it didn't make a difference so the convenience factor came into it for us; it was cheaper to use drywall, setting compound, tape compound, sand, prime and paint than it was to use blueboard+veneer plaster, given the location and the look of the new kitchen.

So to me it's your call: the old "traditional" look - or something more modern...

Big Bob 02-28-2010 11:42 AM

I am not knocking the old time carpenters & framers... Lots of good work still standing tall and tight. Few today would attempt to tackle construction (even quicky, tiny projects) with out power tools.

But, know that many were not real picky when it came to belly's and bows
on wall studs & ceiling joist. They knew the plaster crew would make it all look right.

Once Plaster and lathe (wood, metal or early gyp board) is removed study
framing for an even plane.
Also Consider your trim plan...

Options may be:
if plane is straight... std drywall works fine.
if NOT straight::
Fur out studs to even plane. then std drywall.
or
if plane not to far out...Std drywall with leveling skim coat.
or
blue board and plaster. (a nice way to go... to help hold historical character)

The benifits to plaster & lathe removal include access to seal, insulate, rewire, inspect for hidden damage... etc..

IF existing plaster and framing conditions allow a rock over: it may save you considerable time, effort and money.

Let us know how this project goes.. have fun and stay safe.

Tonglebeak 02-28-2010 06:13 PM

Thanks for the replies guys. It'll still be quite a while before I take everything down....it's a very slow process, cleaning up all of that crap, and plus I have hardcore ADD or something lol. But I'm definitely going for the plaster look. I just wasn't sure how much abuse gypsum with a plaster coat on it can really take.

Leah Frances 02-28-2010 08:41 PM

I'm super pleased with the blueboard+ veneer projects that I have done. Sitting in my sunroom with veneer plater on the ceiling and one wall and DAMN it looks nice.


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