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-   -   Best way to drywall 8'3" x 4'6" (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/best-way-drywall-83-x-46-a-21428/)

bakerhouse 05-25-2008 11:53 AM

Best way to drywall 8'3" x 4'6"
 
We are drywalling the kitchen and I'm curious what people think is the best way to position the drywall for a wall 8'3" H x 4' 6" W. Should I use 12' sheets and cut to lay vertically or 8' horizontal? If horizontal, Should I cut it to fit with 3 equal size pieces to accommodate the 3"?

Thanks.

AtlanticWBConst. 05-25-2008 11:59 AM

Purchase 8' sheetrock and lay horizontally (after the ceiling sheetrock is installed).
Put the first sheet up tight to the ceiling, the second sheet under it. Install a strip on the floor part, which, at 3", should end up being covered by the baseboard (standard base is 3-1/2" wide (and may sit higher if you are installing flooring material too).

Sir MixAlot 05-25-2008 01:03 PM

I would suggest to keep the drywall a 1/2" up off of the floor.

AtlanticWBConst. 05-25-2008 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir MixAlot (Post 125727)
I would suggest to keep the drywall a 1/2" up off of the floor.

Good reminder for the DIYer.

To the OP,
Regardless of the size of your baseboard, we always subtract 1/2" off the lower sheet, or in this case the 3" strip. That way, you will not have to fight the sheetrock to install it, because that lower area will 99% of the time, be hidden from view. So, your strip will be about 2 -1/2" for ease of installation. (FWIW: Because of that strip's height and installation location, it is in effect, just a backer strip for your baseboard).

bakerhouse 05-25-2008 06:12 PM

Thanks for the help. Ceiling is finished, walls tomorrow!

nap 05-25-2008 06:48 PM

hey drywall guys! isn't there such thing as 54" (strangely enough exactly what the OP needs 4' 6") wide rock? is so, would it be worth the trouble to grab a sheet of 54" X 9' or 10' so there are no seams?

Not my gig but I don;t like seams so I though this might be a possibility.

buletbob 05-25-2008 08:09 PM

I put A five foot wide piece on the top and then cut and install a four foot wide piece on the bottom. My spackler was charging me more for getting down on his knees to two coat the bottom seam, because when the wall was finished painted the recess in the drywall showed up on top of the base. I did not liked the way it looked and pulled the base, spackled the seam repainted and installed the base back.
just something to think about.

AtlanticWBConst. 05-25-2008 09:30 PM

Now that you mention it, the 2" factory indentation of the lower side of a full sheet (factory edge), would in fact need to be "filled in". However, that is not a big issue, in terms of what needs to be done. 6" knife - fill in the indentation.
Filling (coating) an edge like that, is no where near the amount of work, of what coating an actual seam requires.

AtlanticWBConst. 05-25-2008 09:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nap (Post 125763)
hey drywall guys! isn't there such thing as 54" (strangely enough exactly what the OP needs 4' 6") wide rock? is so, would it be worth the trouble to grab a sheet of 54" X 9' or 10' so there are no seams?

Not my gig but I don;t like seams so I though this might be a possibility.

Yes, there is such a thing as 54" wide sheets. They are primarily in demand for older homes with taller ceilings. Hope you have a 54" T-square to cut it straight...

nap 05-25-2008 10:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 125780)
Yes, there is such a thing as 54" wide sheets. They are primarily in demand for older homes with taller ceilings. Hope you have a 54" T-square to cut it straight...

cutting is the easy part. there is a straight edge on both sides.

if this was readily available, not only would it remove any seams in the field, it would also remove any reduced edge on the top or bottom since you would set it vertically and the reduces edges would be at the sides where you would be using corner bead and mudding anyway.

just a thought. Lke I said, rock ain't my gig.

tandyt 05-25-2008 11:33 PM

54" is a little more difficult to find than 48". Most the houses in my area have 9 foot ceilings so we're always using 54". But since this is just a small patch, use whatever rock is easier to find. You will have the 2 1/2" recess to fill along with the bottom joint if you go with the 48". But it will be a recessed edge, so it is easy to fill and easy to get flat.


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