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-   -   Best picture hanging system that won't damage plaster walls? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/best-picture-hanging-system-wont-damage-plaster-walls-159014/)

ohman 10-05-2012 02:48 AM

Best picture hanging system that won't damage plaster walls?
 
Hi all, thanks again in advance for all the help that you can provide. I really appreciate that.

Recently we have been trying to fix a lot of nail holes in the house, and some of the big nails really did a lot of damage (cracks) to the plaster wall (the house is located in San Francisco and was built in 1935, so it's an old house). Anyway, to avoid this to happen again, I'm trying to find a good picture hanging kit/solution. I found this "Takker" picture hanging kit, does anyone here has any experience about this on old (pre-1950) plaster walls? It seems that it will create a very small nail hole on the wall, but some (google around) has reported that it does NOT work well for hard plaster walls.

Other than Takker, is there any other solutions that people found helpful to prevent wall (plaster) damages? Any thoughts or comments would be highly appreciated. Thanks again! :cool:

ohman 10-05-2012 02:52 AM

By the way, while I'm googling around, I found this and this articles, which are related...

oh'mike 10-05-2012 05:15 AM

That first one says," not suitable for use on plaster with high cement content"

You might not have success----

The instructions in you first like sound good--------

Blondesense 10-08-2012 11:40 AM

Have you considered picture rail moulding?
Something like this...

http://activerain.com/blogsview/2079...lding-in-homes

ohman 10-08-2012 03:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blondesense (Post 1026459)
Have you considered picture rail moulding?
Something like this...

http://activerain.com/blogsview/2079...lding-in-homes

Thanks for the picture rail molding idea, but would it be expensive to do it this way? Is there another inexpensive solution? Thanks!

concretemasonry 10-08-2012 03:23 PM

Aside from the classic systems that involve from the cove molding with adjustments are not cheap.

Depending on the size of the frame most more modern system always involve penetrating the wall surface, but the right type of hangers do little damage that can be patched easily. The "nail" must be angled and be sharp to penetrate easily.

For big or heavy frames, a lateral wire on the frame makes the individual wall attachment loads much less and are easier to adjust for levelness.

The attachment reference seems just like a kit that can be bought at any good hardware store.

Dick

ohman 10-08-2012 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by concretemasonry (Post 1026606)

The attachment reference seems just like a kit that can be bought at any good hardware store.

Dick

Thanks for your help. Do you have a web link to some of the "attachment reference" products that you were mentioning? Thanks!

ohman 10-08-2012 04:44 PM

I guess something like this OOK picture hanging kit would be good, as the nail seems to be really sharp and solid?? Any experience with this type of OOK kits with plaster walls??

user1007 10-08-2012 05:24 PM

I put holes in walls for art and patched them for part of my living. Most of my past working life. Art galleries were my clients.

Decide how heavy your piece and whether plaster, perhaps separated from the lathe behind it, can hold it. If you are good to go?

Fools suggest covering plaster with tape to prevent it from fracturing when you try to hammer fasteners into it. I loved the calls I got to come fix it!

These masonry things sometimes work on plaster walls but you must tap, not pound them in place. They do not hold much. There is actually a tre-cool system for mounting art to brick now that is non invasive. Spring loaded clips grab the top and bottom of brick and provide a more or less mid brick hook.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Zt2xo3hCzd...d+concrete.jpg

For permanent home installations I used flat picture hangers, screw anchors and screws. You will need to invest in good masonry bit and a drill.

http://www.govart.com/images/hwr_har...plastslgLG.jpg

Measure carefully so you come close to where you want the art to hang. Check with a stud finder or with a tiny drill to see if you need to drill for an anchor. If so, you have a pilot hole for the screw through the hanger into the stud. If not, use your masonry bit to drill for the screw anchor. Put it in place. Attach your hanger. Toss the screws that come with most of the anchors and buy some good US forged and plated ones. The Chinese crappy ones strip on you instantly even in a plastic anchor.

I have yet to damage the oldest of plaster walls with a thin masonry bit. Not saying I have not been lucky.

If you missed where the art should be by 4 or more inches? Your an idjut. If it is off just a bit, tweak the framing wire.

Obviously horizontally long pieces need more than one hanger. Heavy ones two.

If the piece is exceptional heavy, you must not rely on the lathe and plaster (or drywall for that matter) to hold it.

Please promise me! No adhesive to hold so much as a temporary sign up on painted walls ok? I will fly to wherever you are and fix any holes you make in walls but I hate adhesive damages. And those peel and stick things are pure evil.

My other fave system for things like kid posters. Screw heads and super magnets. Poster sizes do not change but tastes and trends do. I actually use the system for large pieces of paper and fabric art. Screw heads down flush with the surface. Use screw anchors. Then buy a pack of super magnets. Mount the poster, attach it with magnets. Nice surface WITHOUT ADHESIVES. Easy to repair holes.

coupe 10-08-2012 07:33 PM

scotch tape?

user1007 10-08-2012 07:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coupe (Post 1026799)
scotch tape?

never ever put an adhesive on a painted wall!!!

ohman 10-09-2012 02:00 PM

sdsester, thanks SO MUCH for your wonderful post. I really appreciate that.

I believe that 4-pin thing that you mentioned is manufactured by OOK and is known as "OOK 59251" (google it for more info)... I have also found that OOK 50918 also has good review on amazon. I wonder if anyone tried these two on plaster walls before and can maybe comment on which one would do less damaging to the wall? Thanks again!!


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