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Old 02-27-2013, 05:39 PM   #1
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Beginner's Approach


sup everybody

I have a few questions about approaching a drywall repair. Image wrapped in bbCode can be seen below.



Should I just cut around the ruined drywall or should I make cuts with concern for shape of new drywall and wall stud locations?

It seems alittle tough to get a clean cut with the utility knife I have even using a fresh blade. Can anyone recommend a different cutting instrument?

As for resources I will need...new sheetrock, mud, putty/mud knife, drywall screws, drill...anything else like mud tape?

The standard size of the sheet rock would be 1/2 inch thick right?

Sorry for being all over the place in this post...

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Old 02-27-2013, 06:01 PM   #2
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Beginner's Approach


Measure the thickness and you will know, but yes most of the times walls are 1/2".
You need a square cut.
A simple key hole or drywall saw will work fine.
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...electedIndex=3
Any box store sell small pieces EG 2 X 2 or 4 X 4 pieces.
Make it simple for yourself and just open up the the hole up to the edges of the studs, add a 2 X 4 to the side so you have something to screw the new rock to.
Once that's done adding some scraps top and bottom will making finishing easer.
Make sure there's no paper burrs sticking out.
Apply some green top drywall mud with a 6" wide, apply paper tape, and add some more drywall mud over it.
Thin coats is the key.
Next coat use a wider knife.
It's going to take at least three coats.
That other patch I see is going to need a 12" knife to feather out to get it looking flat.

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Old 02-27-2013, 06:34 PM   #3
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Beginner's Approach


You don't need a square cut. Rectangular or close is easier than round, but not strictly necessary. Using a drywall saw, if you are near a stud, then cut back to it and expose half the stud with your utility knife. On the other sides, use furring strips behind the wall and your patch, and screw into the furring strips from both the existing wall and your new patch. Google for details on this.

The easiest way to fit a large patch is to cut your patch piece a little bigger than you need. Then trace around your patch on the wall, and cut out along your trace. Then your patch will fit perfectly in the hole in the wall.
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Old 02-27-2013, 06:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeclancy View Post
The standard size of the sheet rock would be 1/2 inch thick right?
Standard doesn't matter. Your new drywall patch should be the same thickness as your existing wall, whatever it is. 1/2" and 5/8" are the most common.
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Old 02-27-2013, 06:41 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
You don't need a square cut. Rectangular or close is easier than round, but not strictly necessary. Using a drywall saw, if you are near a stud, then cut back to it and expose half the stud with your utility knife. On the other sides, use furring strips behind the wall and your patch, and screw into the furring strips from both the existing wall and your new patch. Google for details on this.

The easiest way to fit a large patch is to cut your patch piece a little bigger than you need. Then trace around your patch on the wall, and cut out along your trace. Then your patch will fit perfectly in the hole in the wall.
Got ya on the shape, trying to get to the middle of a stud and having to deal with running into the the scews is a pain and not nessary.
Why would anyone want to have to try and trim a small amount off? Cut the patch 1/4 samller and screw it to the wall, done.
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Old 02-27-2013, 06:47 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Make it simple for yourself and just open up the the hole up to the edges of the studs, add a 2 X 4 to the side so you have something to screw the new rock to.
I didn't originally understand this. This is not a bad way to do it, with the caveat that if the new stud segment is not attached very securely to the wall stud, it can move slightly with the changing seasons and cause the joint to crack. Putting both pieces of drywall on the same stud eliminates the joint problem, but it is a pain because there's not much room and it's not easy to cut that drywall piece.

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