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Old 06-05-2012, 03:54 PM   #16
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Bathroom Wall Repair


There is no access panel. I can cut one
from the closet. Hopefully, I will be able to better see if there is a leak.
I have not noticed evidence of leak, but the wood
obviously shows signs of water. Does it
matter how high or low the access hole is?

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Old 06-05-2012, 10:34 PM   #17
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I'm thinking in your case it's probably just easier to remove all of the wallboard (at least all of the effected walls). You're going to spend just as much time trying to patch in pieces as you would replacing entire walls, and it's actually easier to do entire walls. You're not going to have a huge increase in cost, because you'll need to buy a bucket of mud and a roll of tape anyway, so you're only adding in cost for a couple more sheets of wallboard. This also lets you inspect everything behind the walls, possibly without opening access panels in adjoining rooms. Hopefully, the lumber (studs, etc.) are still good and you can just treat/clean the mold, and replace the regular drywall with green-board (or similar product).
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Old 06-06-2012, 05:57 AM   #18
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Thanks for the replies guys,

The previous owner ran grout where the tub and tile meet. There are cracks, kicking myself for not being on top of this.

Is grout typically used where the tub and tile meet? Also, would you remove the grout and replace it with silicone caulk? Or just go on top of the grout?

Again, I appreciate your help.

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Old 06-06-2012, 07:37 PM   #19
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working on the opening for the access panel...so far everything appears dry.
I still have to purchase the panel. My opening will be larger, and cut cleaner!
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Old 06-07-2012, 08:38 AM   #20
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That could be your leak, all surfaces with a change in plane or corners like that you should only have 100% silicone caulk there. Water got behind and ran down the wall. With that said and seeing the tile guy who did that did a half azzed job, do you know whats behind the tile? Hoping he did not just slap tile on wallboard. The small tiles look like travertine and if so that lets a lot of water in if not sealed. If so you got more issues.....

Last edited by pwgsx; 06-07-2012 at 09:02 AM.
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Old 06-09-2012, 06:21 AM   #21
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Purchased a 14 X 14 access panel that I will install today. I will be able to get a much better look at the area.

Regarding removing the grout where the tub and tile meet, I saw this video of a guy using a dremmel to cut the grout.

youtube video

Is it better to remove it manually?
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Old 06-09-2012, 12:51 PM   #22
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My access panel is 15 X 15. When I examined the opening I created, it looked dry in there, no evidence of water or mold.

This view is through the access opening, showing the other side of the shower wall. Does this look ok?



Here is the access door installed.



I now need to remove the grout where the tub and tile meet and fill with silicone caulk. Fill the tub before adding the caulk, correct? I've seen that in a few videos.

As always, thanks for your help!

Last edited by joetab24; 06-09-2012 at 12:54 PM.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:02 PM   #23
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Fill the tub?? Why? Just scrape out the grout and clean it up well, make sure the surface is not wet and caulk away.
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Old 06-11-2012, 10:02 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwgsx View Post
Fill the tub?? Why? Just scrape out the grout and clean it up well, make sure the surface is not wet and caulk away.
I think OP was thinking there was a need to fill it up to weigh it down like you may do during a new install...
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Old 06-12-2012, 09:17 AM   #25
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Maybe but thats not needed. Dont forget silicone will not stick to a wet surface BUT a wet finger to smooth it out works wonders. You can use a soap solution and dip your finger in, rubbing alcohol or even your own spit. Check out the JohnBridge forums for a nice How To topic on this.
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Old 06-12-2012, 02:02 PM   #26
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Alright,

I've caulked where the floor tile meets the tub and, on the inside, where the tub tile meets the tub.

Should I also add caulk here?, where the two walls meet? The grout that is here looks good, unlike the grout that I removed to add the caulk? Can I put silicone caulk right over this grout?



It was suggested above that I might find it easier to just remove the whole piece of drywall rather than trying to repair this smaller section.

If I do choose to do the smaller repair, should I remove the whole metal piece that is on the end? The end of this metal piece, where I removed the drywall, is sticking out.


Thanks for your help! And, obviously, I was able to remove the surface mold from the wood.

Last edited by joetab24; 06-12-2012 at 02:04 PM.
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Old 06-12-2012, 02:15 PM   #27
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Yes you should caulk all corners as well. You should remove the grout and then caulk but do as you want. Im afraid that water is still going to be getting behind the tiles as they are not what you typically put on a wall that gets wet and if you do use that tile there whould be a waterproof membrane behind it ( red guard, kerdi or similar). After you caulk I would apply a tile sealer to the entire wall to try and keep water from seeping in the grout lines and the stone tile as well.

You can leave that metal corner there or cut that bad piece out- its not needed by your shower as tile is covering the corner.

Last edited by pwgsx; 06-12-2012 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 06-13-2012, 03:51 PM   #28
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I was dumb for trying to patch the drywall. Tried three times and looked like crap. The metal piece was difficult to cut without it curling up.

So I am going to replace the whole piece.



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Old 06-13-2012, 05:19 PM   #29
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didn't realize this until I started removing more drywall. The metal piece is behind the tile/backerboard. So as I remove the wall I am left with the metal piece, which, up to this point, I have tried to twist it off/cut it. I really wanted to clean things up, make sure everything was caulked dried, and then save to have the bathroom gutted and done right.

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Old 06-14-2012, 02:10 PM   #30
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Joe-
You're not "dumb" for trying, you've just learned some valuable experience! The is the reason why I suggested removing the entire sheet(s); sometimes it's easier to remove and replace things than it is to repair them. I'm not sure what tools you have, but some options for cutting those metal corner-beads are tin snips, a small hack saw, a grinder wheel, reciprocating saw with short metal blade, or a jigsaw with a short metal blade. If you don't have any of those, a pair of tin snips is fairly cheap, and you should be able to cut it pretty close to wall, and then hammer (lightly) as much excess material flat onto, or into, the wallboard as possible. Then, cover with mud, smooth it out, sand, and you're ready for primer and paint. If you're left with a hump, you'll just have to feather the mud out over a larger area to make the hump less obvious.

Another option is to just pop in some more drywall screws through the corner-bead and see if you can pull it back into the wall enough to mud over it.

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