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Gigs 12-22-2008 08:44 AM

Bathroom Drywall Water Damage
 
3 Attachment(s)
I have water damage above my shower due to splashing. House is only about 8 years old.



Pictures attached.



How do I fix this? I'd like to fix it in a more or less minimal way that will still hold up to splashing better than it did the first time around.

Termite 12-22-2008 11:19 AM

Drywall that has been wet is pretty much impossible to save. The product's internal bond is degraded, and anything you do to it is a band-aid fix. My suggestion would be to cut the rock out from the ceiling line down and replace the whole thing. You could cut out the damaged areas only and patch, but new rock would be less work and would look cleaner unless you're one heck of a good sheetrock patcher.

Use a sharp knife to cut the tape at the ceiling/wall transition and at the corners and carefully remove it. Install new rock, mud and tape, prime, and paint. Then, carefully caulk the joint to the tub surround and smooth the caulk with a wet finger so water will run past it.

Gigs 12-22-2008 11:40 AM

The back is toast, but what about the side walls? A sort of paper tape peeled off those (I don't know much of anything about drywalling), but they don't seem too bad otherwise.

If I just paint and caulk it (I mean after replacing the back panel), won't this happen again? Was it because they used the wrong paint the first time?

The way it failed is the paper tape curled, pulling the paint with it.

Termite 12-22-2008 12:48 PM

I'm assuming you're talking about the paper tape that is used at corners and seams. The reason I say that is because drywall does have a paper face as well...If it were to peel then the rock is definately toast.

If the tape is peeling, it is safe to assume water damage. But, it is also possible that the tape was pushed too hard into the mud when it was applied and there was never a good bond. Either way, replace.

Ron6519 12-22-2008 02:35 PM

It might help if you use the correct material for the room. Seems the builders used regular sheetrock in an area not suited for this.
Splashing 5 feet high would dictate a paperless product, and a quality primer and paint. None of which was used before.
Ron

bjbatlanta 12-22-2008 04:35 PM

Paperless or regular, the tape won't stay bonded if not caulked and painted properly. That's the bottom line as Ron pointed out. Cut the drywall back, install backerboard wide enough for a row or two of tile...... Just another idea rather than have to refinish the rock and repaint.

duckdown 12-30-2008 11:09 AM

Remove the drywall and consider replacing with backerboard...

AtlanticWBConst. 12-30-2008 07:33 PM

"Backerboard" encompasses anything that you use, or install, as a backerboard (including wood).

....You must mean Cement Backerboard.

Gigs 12-30-2008 07:47 PM

Is there a guide somewhere for putting a row or two of tile, transitioning to drywall?

I guess I can buy backerboard the same thickness as the drywall to make it easier, but I'd feel more comfortable with a guide or something to follow, since I've never done anything like this before.

4just1don 12-31-2008 04:20 AM

tile it all the way to the ceiling,,,easier to do,no transition,few rows extra,,,then looks finished

kgphoto 01-01-2009 06:22 PM

I think you guys are into over kill. It doesn't look too bad from the picture.

First, scrape out all the mud and trim the drywall so it has a 1/4" gap off the tub enclosure. Then install backer board and caulking flush to surface.

You can "flat tape" to within 1/8 " of the enclosure. Then prime the drywall. Then caulk the edge. Them prime one more time and put two coats of semi-gloss latex.

While oil-based would last longer, it will take longer to put up and dry. Make sure to use a fan or keep the window open while showering.

Gigs 01-01-2009 10:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kgphoto (Post 205424)
I think you guys are into over kill. It doesn't look too bad from the picture.

I think some of the suggestions are overkill but it's good to know the options.

It may be worse than it looks, at a minimum, the bottom 6-8 inches of drywall is going to need to go, the paper front of the drywall has been compromised and it's pulled away.

Quote:

First, scrape out all the mud and trim the drywall so it has a 1/4" gap off the tub enclosure. Then install backer board and caulking flush to surface.
Install a strip of concrete backerboard even if I'm not using tile? What's the purpose of that? Is it more resistant to water?

Quote:

While oil-based would last longer, it will take longer to put up and dry. Make sure to use a fan or keep the window open while showering
This isn't a general moisture issue, the shower is kind of "short" and the water splashes and completely soaks the bottom few inches of drywall in the damaged places.

I'm leaning toward the "row or two of tile" suggestions at this point, because this really does need to withstand a good soaking every day.

kgphoto 01-02-2009 03:30 AM

My bad, I meant backer rod not backer board, which is round closed cell foam. As long as the paint membrane is in tact it will shed water. Caulk at the juncture will hold out any settled water, again as long as it is intact. You will have to check annually to see if any areas open up or chip.

Youi can use Gardz to seal the drywall and flat tape it and that will take care of the drywall. I mean, just by looking at the pictures. If you are there and it is a rotten crumbly mess, by all means replace it. I wouldn't do a patch, just change the whole thing.


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