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-   -   Bathroom Drywall (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/bathroom-drywall-4888/)

jeepwillies 11-18-2006 11:12 PM

Bathroom Drywall
 
I am at the drywalling stage in my reno project and I need to put in the drywall in the shower section of my bath.

So I think I am supposed to use a different type of drywall, right? If so, is there any diffence in how I install it?
Also what about where it meets up with the regular drywall, how is that done? Does this different drywall get mudded and taped? What about the seam between the two drywalls, is that taped and mudded?

Any help would be great.

Cheers!

ncor 11-18-2006 11:37 PM

hardi board a 3x5 cementious material is generally used in showers now days where you have a tile shower

AtlanticWBConst. 11-19-2006 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeepwillies (Post 24071)
I am at the drywalling stage in my reno project and I need to put in the drywall in the shower section of my bath.

So I think I am supposed to use a different type of drywall, right? If so, is there any diffence in how I install it?
Also what about where it meets up with the regular drywall, how is that done? Does this different drywall get mudded and taped? What about the seam between the two drywalls, is that taped and mudded?

Any help would be great.

Cheers!


If the area is going to be tiled, or will receive direct water on it, then use cement board. If you are going to cover or coat the seams, then use thinset.

If the walls are in the bathroom, but will not receive any direct water on them, then you can use Moisture resistant (green board-it is rated as 'water vapor' resistant) There is also a sheetrock that is rated as MR and 'mold resistant' (made by National Gypsum).
Again, if the areas are not going to be receiving direct water, then just use regular compound and cover with a mold resistant paint.

BTW- If you aready installed regular sheetrock and used regular compound in the bathroom, as long as the surfaces do not receive direct water, they should be fine.

If you do use cement board and it 'butts' into regular sheetrock (which should be beyond the areas of direct water)...you can use regular compound on the seams, though I would suggest using the fiberglass mesh instead of paper tape at those seams.

MrRyan001 06-21-2009 03:01 PM

Joint Compound
 
I currently have moisture resistant drywall put up in my new bathroom. I'm wondering if there is special moisture resistant tape or compound that I use or can I use regular joint compound? The national gympsum website has mold resistant joint compound but i haven't seen it sold in any homedepot so i am not sure if it is needed or not. Also I did see mold resistant fiberglass tape but have been told not to use fiberglass tape. Can I use normal joint compound and normal drywall tape in bathroom?

Scuba_Dave 06-21-2009 04:07 PM

Better to start a new thread then dig up a 2 1/2 year old thread

Maintenance 6 06-22-2009 08:37 AM

Not much point in putting up moisture resistant drywall to prevent mold and then taping it with mold food. Use the glass tape and mold resistant drywall mud. GP makes one called densarmorcote. I've seen it at Lowes.

cody21 06-22-2009 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maintenance 6 (Post 291107)
Not much point in putting up moisture resistant drywall to prevent mold and then taping it with mold food. Use the glass tape and mold resistant drywall mud. GP makes one called densarmorcote. I've seen it at Lowes.

hmm. interesting thread. I'm in the same boat.

I am planning on using the Fibreglass self-adhereing mesh tape for my joints; different kinds for the Cement backerboard vs. the Greenboard.

As far as the JOINT COMPOUND - you're saying that there is a "Mold resistant" kind that we should buy? I had bought the tub of pre-made ALL-PUPROSE JOINT COMPOUND at Home Depot. Is that NOT sufficient for TAPING my JOINTS in a bathroom???? The second part is the "mudding" of the drywall -- I get the point to make sure that we get the kind with Mold-resistant additive... now just to find it... Thanks

bjbatlanta 06-22-2009 08:44 PM

I have a house that is 35+ years old. It has regular drywall both bathrooms. They are both painted with appropriate paint for an area that could have "moisture issues". They both have proper ventilation. Neither has ever had a "mold issue" in the 23 years I've been here. I hang regular drywall in bathrooms all the time. I make sure there is adequate venting before it gets hung. I use regular ready-mix joint compound, I advise homeowners who want to do their own painting as to proper paint to use. Never had a "call back" for mold issues..........

adpanko 06-22-2009 09:23 PM

For the drywall that will be directly in the shower stall or bath stall area, it depends what finished wall surface your're doing. If you are doing a tile surround, the only right option is to use the 1/2" concrete backer board, which gets the mesh tape and thinset to finish the joints, not traditional drywall spackle. Concrete backer board doesn't repel water, so if you do get water behind the tile, the backerboard won't prevent it from getting into the wall cavity. But backerboard won't turn to mush like all forms of drywall will. It will keeps its structural integrity uncompromised.

On the other hand, if your shower or bath surround is going to be something like Swanstone wall panels, then normal drywall will suffice, don't need backerboard (in my opnion). Since the only joints in a wall system are the corners, which are easy enough to seal off really well, water seepage shouldn't really be a concern.

As for the other walls in the room (that aren't in the actual shower/bath area) I've read enough reviews and other user feedback stating that greenboard and the mold resistant stuff are simply overhyped. Greenboard has been around a while, but I've heard some local pros say it doesn't do much above and beyond regular drywall, and the mold resistant stuff is just the industry basically preying on peoples' fear of all things mold. The basic fact is that mold has been around as long as water has, but for some reason the hyper fear about black mold or death mold or whatever else it is called is a fairly recent phenomenon.

I agree with the other poster that said as long as you prime and properly paint the walls, that is all the water resistance you need. The normal amount of small splashing in the room won't penetrate a good paint job. But behind the shower, if you are tiling the walls, concrete is a must because you will inevitably get water behind the tiles over time.

DavidAnthony411 05-02-2011 01:08 PM

sheetrock in shower or ?...
 
1 Attachment(s)
i want a smooth surface, not tiled inside the shower stall that will be primed and painted. What kind of rock or board should I use for this look? See attachment

new here so thankx in advance for any info
DA

Blondesense 05-02-2011 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave (Post 290877)
Better to start a new thread then dig up a 2 1/2 year old thread

Better to start a new thread then dig up a 3 1/2 year old thread.

canadaclub 05-03-2011 01:04 PM

Very cool looking shower! You can still watch TV and entertain guests while getting clean:laughing:


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