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Old 03-23-2013, 07:48 PM   #1
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Hi All,

Finishing the basement. Starting to plan for the drywall stage. I was going to go with 1/2" for the walls. Need to do ceiling too. We have engineered floor joists that are 16" on center. Have to use 8 foot boards because that's all we can get down to the basement. Curious as to what I need to use for the ceiling? Can I get by with 3/8? Do I have to do 1/2", or do I need to do 3/4"?

Thanks for your thoughts!

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Old 03-23-2013, 08:13 PM   #2
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1/2" light weight on the ceiling, reguler 1/2 drywall on the walls will work.
It would be faster and less seams if you could use 12' but you have no choise it you can not get them in there.
Use screws not nails.
Install the ceiling first.
Install the drywall on the walls horizontal and install the top piece first.
Keep it 1/2" up off the floors.

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Old 03-23-2013, 08:38 PM   #3
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i agree 1/2" on the ceiling and 1/2" on the walls. if you just framed the walls and the framing is perfect 16" o.c then i recommend putting your sheets up vertically. there is always the big debate of vertical or horizontal.
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Old 03-24-2013, 06:07 AM   #4
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Horizontal...especially with temp and humidity swings that occur in basements.
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Old 03-24-2013, 06:57 AM   #5
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Thanks for the tips guys. Any reason for doing ceiling first?

Also, I was hoping to install wall panels vertically to minimize seams. What effects will temperature/humidity swings have on vertical that would be lessened by hanging horizontal?

Thanks again!
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:01 AM   #6
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I wish someone would explain the advantage to hanging sheets vertical in residential. It usually doubles the amount of taping and mudding, you must be sure every sheet ends in the center of the stud, most electric is next to the stud so when cut out makes problem for taping(especially for DIY) with advent of butt boards butt joints are a thing of the past. Plus if the wall happens to be wavy it tends to show more with vertical. I'm not trying to start an argument or be a smart a$$ I just don't see it.
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:34 AM   #7
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board your ceiling first so your wall board butt up to the ceiling boards if not then your going to have issues with gaps around the perimeter of the ceiling.
and i dont want to start the big debate again. lots of drywallers prefer to hang their sheets horizontally and lots hang there sheets vertically. now get a group of them together and figure out what the best method is. the end result will be world war 3.
i find they are easier to hang on your own
no butt joints and yes there are butt boards but why have to go out and buy more products to do a nice job when you dont have to
i do not understand the math for less tape doing it horizontal. i'd think you'd use more mud horizontally.
you have a 16' wall 8's are the only boards that fit in your basement. luckly theres a stud on 8'(best case) you hang your top 2 sheets with one butt. now for your bottom sheets you now have to stagger your joints so 3 butts on your bottom sheet!!
your inside vertically corners dont turn out as nice with a joint in the middle
lots of basements dont have true 8' high ceilings. ripping sheets is more of a pain.
i also hear of guys say horizontal is stronger but if your putting drywall up for structure then you have some major issues.
and well the list goes on. im all for what works out best. i'll hang them horizontally but only if it works out in my favour.

and 12penny could you explain more about temp and humidity changes and your reasoning for hanging them horizontally because of it?
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:42 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ToolSeeker View Post
I wish someone would explain the advantage to hanging sheets vertical in residential. It usually doubles the amount of taping and mudding, you must be sure every sheet ends in the center of the stud, most electric is next to the stud so when cut out makes problem for taping(especially for DIY) with advent of butt boards butt joints are a thing of the past. Plus if the wall happens to be wavy it tends to show more with vertical. I'm not trying to start an argument or be a smart a$$ I just don't see it.

I dont see the advantage either. And yes...buttboards are the best.

The reasons I dont hang vertical.

I think first of all its just not as strong. Its gotta be a stronger wall spanning 7 or 8 studs as opposed to 3 or 4.

Studs must be exactly plumb and/or square to the ceiling. 1/4" off makes it difficult to set screws along the edge.

As the studs dry during the winter and then rehydrate in the summer they expand and contract. IMHO this can only lead to cracks at the seams. Not to mention twisting.

Steel studs, in particular commercial work, is the only time I would consider vertical.

Hang ceiling first, then walls. The wall sheets lend support to the ceiling sheets. Typically, I dont put a screw in the ceiling closer than about 8" from the corner.

Last edited by 12penny; 03-24-2013 at 07:44 AM.
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:49 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by princelake View Post
board your ceiling first so your wall board butt up to the ceiling boards if not then your going to have issues with gaps around the perimeter of the ceiling.
and i dont want to start the big debate again. lots of drywallers prefer to hang their sheets horizontally and lots hang there sheets vertically. now get a group of them together and figure out what the best method is. the end result will be world war 3.
i find they are easier to hang on your own
no butt joints and yes there are butt boards but why have to go out and buy more products to do a nice job when you dont have to
i do not understand the math for less tape doing it horizontal. i'd think you'd use more mud horizontally.
you have a 16' wall 8's are the only boards that fit in your basement. luckly theres a stud on 8'(best case) you hang your top 2 sheets with one butt. now for your bottom sheets you now have to stagger your joints so 3 butts on your bottom sheet!!
your inside vertically corners dont turn out as nice with a joint in the middle
lots of basements dont have true 8' high ceilings. ripping sheets is more of a pain.
i also hear of guys say horizontal is stronger but if your putting drywall up for structure then you have some major issues.
and well the list goes on. im all for what works out best. i'll hang them horizontally but only if it works out in my favour.

?


Simple...saves time and material. Saves mud cause you dont have to feather out so far. Saves time for the same reason. That savings in labor and material more than make up for the cost.


and 12penny could you explain more about temp and humidity changes and your reasoning for hanging them horizontally because of it


Sure can, but not much to explain. The whole 8' seam on 1 stud, any movement of said stud will cause cracking. Hang horizontal with staggered seams and theres a 4' section of the stud being held in place. Less movement, less chance of cracking. I wont risk my reputation, money, time or sanity chasing down drywall cracks when I know they can be prevented using a little logic.

Last edited by 12penny; 03-24-2013 at 07:56 AM.
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Old 03-24-2013, 07:53 AM   #10
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the lazy blow and go contrators go with vertical my opinion. hanging it horizontal gives you more shear strength then vertical. you better have 100% purfect framing if you do vertical and no short stud cavities either you have to make sure that each sheet edge lines up purfect on the center of each stud. So
for my advice horzontal is easier and Butt boards are cheap in the long run
as for amount of mudding and taping you have to do. it is the same amount. If you go and use USG's sheet rock estimator it will tell you the amount of mud and tape you will need. the linear feet of tape is the same either way. according to USG.
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Old 03-24-2013, 05:25 PM   #11
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your telling me with the humidity and temps that it will move the studs enough to crack on my tapered joint? really? if taped properly the paper will bond with the paper on the drywall. i can see possibly with mesh tape doing this. and if you do have movement your butt joint would be the first joint to crack because you only have 3/4" of the sheet on the none tapered end screwed to the stud where the drywall is weaker and it loves to crumble if you get a little to close to the edge. and this whole structural drywall thing is a joke. drywall has zero structure to it. it has no strength! your 2x4s and exterior plywood is your strength! and yes its been debated before and usg is correct with the same amount of tape going either way. and lazy blow and go contractors?? all the top drywallers here locally hang vertically. i will keep saying it hang whatever way works out better for sheets used. if hanging them on a 45 works out best then do it that way geez.
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Old 03-24-2013, 06:16 PM   #12
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Good for you. Carry on. You do it your way, I'll do it mine.
For me horizontal is correct. Nuff said.
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Old 03-24-2013, 06:47 PM   #13
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thank you i will. i'll never say horizontal is wrong and i'll never say vertical is wrong. i walk into a room that needs to be boarded i measure it up and i do whatever works out best and i'll continue to do it that way and i'll continue to do good work and continue to have happy customers. carry on.
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Old 03-24-2013, 06:50 PM   #14
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:04 PM   #15
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Quote:
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your telling me with the humidity and temps that it will move the studs enough to crack on my tapered joint? really? if taped properly the paper will bond with the paper on the drywall. i can see possibly with mesh tape doing this. and if you do have movement your butt joint would be the first joint to crack because you only have 3/4" of the sheet on the none tapered end screwed to the stud where the drywall is weaker and it loves to crumble if you get a little to close to the edge. and this whole structural drywall thing is a joke. drywall has zero structure to it. it has no strength! your 2x4s and exterior plywood is your strength! and yes its been debated before and usg is correct with the same amount of tape going either way. and lazy blow and go contractors?? all the top drywallers here locally hang vertically. i will keep saying it hang whatever way works out better for sheets used. if hanging them on a 45 works out best then do it that way geez.
yeah so what get a DIY'er to do that and have a beveled edge in a inside or out side corner joint and they are going to have major problems. and for 40 extra dollars for a box of butt boards I never have a butt joint problem nice beveled joints every time.

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