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-   -   Another Ceiling Q. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/another-ceiling-q-72246/)

altc81 05-27-2010 08:40 PM

Another Ceiling Q.
 
Acutally this question is a little different. This will be my first time hanging gypsum on a ceiling. Ive hung it before (wall of course). I will be working with 5/8" on 16" centers. Will 1 5/8" coarse screws be sufficient enough?

... So basically here is my concern... Why am I terrified now of having drywall above me? Im definitely over thinking this, but Im so afraid of having it crash down on me and my wife in the middle of the night! Please tell me this is not possible as long as I dont pierce the paper right? Ive practiced in the garage getting my screw through the gypsum and into the stud and having it recessed only enough to hide it once the compoud is over it... But still I feel as if I have gone too far and taken out enough paper. I know this is crazy, maybe I should keep practicing. :wacko:

Does anyone have any pics of a perfect screw into gypsum/ and not the perfect way?

Well... sh*t

Snav 05-27-2010 08:48 PM

Yes, 1-5/8 coarse would work fine but I think that a longer, narrow-thread screw would be less likely to puncture. (The coarse threads REALLY pull it in quick)

I've hung it by myself without any help, it's still up there - no coming down :)

I had to rig a pully-system up with a series of ropes and a homemade T looking thing out of PVC to thread the pipe through. This acted as a firm platform for the drywall to sit on while I raised it.

I screwed a heavy duty U hangar on the wall and used that as a rope-brace to wrap the rope around when hoisting and when attaching it overhead. . . I hoisted a foot or two, wrapped, hoisted, wrapped . .. it was tedious and actually quite exhausting but it got up there.

When it was as high up as it would go I used my head to brace one end while I sunk a few screws in (not all the way - this is just a temporary anchor to hold it up flush-ish) and then started to work from the opposite side to actually fasten it.

It's still up there on the ceiling, I swear :) I didn't hurt myself, either :)

if you puncture with a screw - just sink another screw 2" away from it on either side to ensure adequate support.

It's easier, though, if you do it in smaller pieces - say - 4/5' long instead of 8'

Gary in WA 05-27-2010 10:44 PM

The screw length is fine but use coarse threaded into wood. Fine threaded are for metal studs. Table #1, Table #3, figures #3, 4:

http://www.gypsum.org/pdf/GA-216-07.pdf Don't break the paper face with the screw head.

Be safe, Gary

Snav 05-28-2010 06:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR in WA (Post 447948)
The screw length is fine but use coarse threaded into wood. Fine threaded are for metal studs. Table #1, Table #3, figures #3, 4:

http://www.gypsum.org/pdf/GA-216-07.pdf Don't break the paper face with the screw head.

Be safe, Gary

thank you, I did not know that.

Jim F 05-28-2010 07:01 PM

HD sells a 14 dollar bit called a drywall dimpler that stops the screws from sinking in too far. I bought one after reading about it here and it works pretty good as long as you drill in square. My only complaint is that it does sometimes under penetrate requiring a quarter turn or so manually.

Professonal drywall hangers have all sorts of expensive lifts and jacks to help lift and hold drywall to the ceiling to mount. I built a couple of "deadmen" that I learned about from a Popular Mechanics book from the library.

You basically use a length of 2x2 or 2x4 slightly longer than your ceiling, screw or nail a 2 1/2 to 3 ft length of 2x2 on top of that to form an T and corner brace the two sides of the T with 2x2's. By making it slightly longer you can then prop up each end of your drywall sheet and wedge the deadmen between the floor and ceiling.

Snav 05-28-2010 09:04 PM

I use to have a dimpler that worked great but I lost it.
I bought another one - exact same brand - and it kept over-shooting the depth, drove me nuts.

I eventually figured out how to sink them with a drill, no dempler, and I feel like I have much more control over it all.

Just food for thought.

altc81 05-28-2010 10:36 PM

ok so technically doesnt the underside of the screw head tear the paper away anyways of the drywall as the drill recesses it into the board?
- this is where i seem to be overthinking the process!

Axecutioner-B 05-29-2010 12:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by altc81 (Post 448327)
ok so technically doesnt the underside of the screw head tear the paper away anyways of the drywall as the drill recesses it into the board?
- this is where i seem to be overthinking the process!

Not if it is done right, A properly screwed screw will compress the paper & the head should be recessed BUT NOT to the point where all of the paper around the screw head is torn & the gypsum is showing. I have worked with guys that think they screwed drywall right & every board they hung has almost every screw tearing paper :no:, this weakens the holding power of the screw to the drywall ALOT. Just recess the head enough so it is barely below the paper but not tearing the paper, there is alot of strength in the paper leave as much in tact as possible, it is much stronger this way :thumbup:

bjbatlanta 05-29-2010 08:04 AM

Use glue on the joists also. It will hold the drywall once set and help reduce nail/screw pops. !/2" drywall is fine on 16" centers. Easier to handle. Rent or buy a lift to make it easier to hang the ceiling.

Gary in WA 05-29-2010 08:55 PM

Box stores have these: http://www.amazon.com/WALL-SCREW-ADA.../dp/B00164EYYM

Buy a few as they walk away when not being watched.......

Be safe, Gary


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