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-   -   Adhere Drywall to Residential Studs? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/adhere-drywall-residential-studs-15280/)

TomBrooklyn 01-07-2008 07:06 AM

Adhere Drywall to Residential Studs?
 
I just heard some drywallers put glue on the studs on residential work, then screw on the drywall. I had never heard of that before though.

What's the deal on using adhesive behind drywall?

USP45 01-07-2008 08:05 AM

It gives a more secure bond, helps stop screws or nails from poping out should the studs move.

jerryh3 01-07-2008 04:38 PM

I've never heard of a good drywall hanger not using glue.

AtlanticWBConst. 01-07-2008 06:34 PM

It's a regional thing.

We have a division in our company that has been doing drywall since the early 80's, as well as knowing many, many other drywallers in our area.

Neither we, nor any one of them have ever used, nor been required to apply adhesives for sheetrock. That includes it not being listed as part of any installation procedures in the hundreds upon hundreds of plans that we have reviewed over the years -(Residential, offices, apts, condos, hospitals, schools, industrial, etc....)

We have never had any failures on walls because of this. It is also not required by any codes in our area.

As stated, it's a regional thing.

jerryh3 01-07-2008 08:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 86518)
It's a regional thing.

We have a division in our company that has been doing drywall since the early 80's, as well as knowing many, many other drywallers in our area.

Neither we, nor any one of them have ever used, nor been required to apply adhesives for sheetrock. That includes it not being listed as part of any installation procedures in the hundreds upon hundreds of plans that we have reviewed over the years -(Residential, offices, apts, condos, hospitals, schools, industrial, etc....)

We have never had any failures on walls because of this. It is also not required by any codes in our area.

As stated, it's a regional thing.

Whatever works. I find that when using glue, we reduce the number of screws used. We typically go with: Ceilings, two in the field 16" o.c, three 24" o.c, and only one in the field on the walls. This is assuming the walls/ceilings are straight and true.

AtlanticWBConst. 01-07-2008 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryh3 (Post 86556)
Whatever works. I find that when using glue, we reduce the number of screws used. We typically go with: Ceilings, two in the field 16" o.c, three 24" o.c, and only one in the field on the walls. This is assuming the walls/ceilings are straight and true.

I don't know where you hang your sheetrock, but in our region, Building Codes require one screw every 12", regardless of adhesive use (Building Code Materials Fastener Schedule).

jerryh3 01-07-2008 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 86558)
I don't know where you hang your sheetrock, but in our region, Building Codes require one screw every 12", regardless of adhesive use (Building Code Materials Fastener Schedule).

Maryland. No code enforcement on panel fastener schedule.(Or at least no inspector has ever said anything for the past 1000+ homes). So I guess you are right about the regional thing.

Brik 01-08-2008 08:02 AM

I have done projects in various parts of county. Some use glue, others don't. I subed out the drywall on my basement project. The "standard" from the sub I went with was glued, nailed at top edge and screwed. I didn't even question it.

RippySkippy 01-08-2008 08:54 AM

Our area (central Iowa) requires 5 in the field, and 6 on ends, glue doesn't change the mechanical fastener req's. I had a house '73 version that had the glued drywall, with 2 screws in the field. Nearly every sheet in the house had loose drywall...meaning you could push the drywall back to the stud. A kitchen reno revealed that the glue held tight...the paper though let go of the DW. Every sheet had a stripe on the back where every bit of paper pulled off where it was glued to the stud. I pray they are making the DW better these days! I was never sooooo glad to get out of a house....every corner brought another joyful nugget....

TomBrooklyn 01-08-2008 09:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerryh3 (Post 86556)
I find that when using glue, we reduce the number of screws used. We typically go with: Ceilings, two in the field 16" o.c, three 24" o.c, and only one in the field on the walls. This is assuming the walls/ceilings are straight and true.

Hi Jerry,
I'm not sure if I'm understanding you right. Are you saying you attach 4' x 8' drywall to a ceiling with 2 screws and on walls with one screw, not counting the edge screws? BTW, how many screws do you put on the edges? And what would thickness of sheet rock are you using?

mt232 01-08-2008 09:09 AM

Did the glue come along when nails were still being used?
 
I wish my old nailed drywall had glue, or screws.....as my add a level is almost complete, almost every ceiling on the 1st floor has cracked, shifted, or at least had most nails pop out.......

jerryh3 01-08-2008 03:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TomBrooklyn (Post 86649)
Hi Jerry,
I'm not sure if I'm understanding you right. Are you saying you attach 4' x 8' drywall to a ceiling with 2 screws and on walls with one screw, not counting the edge screws? BTW, how many screws do you put on the edges? And what would thickness of sheet rock are you using?

1/2" 4' X 12' sheets mostly. 5/8" in garages with common walls. Yes, a good bead of glue with two screws in the field(3 w/ 24" o.c. ceilings) and one on the walls. The edges usually get two on the first sheet and three on the sheet that butts against that. I know this goes against what most fastner schedules call for, but in the 30+ years my father hung drywall and the ten I worked with him, we never received a complaint about the quality of hanging or the methods we used. Of course this was only with straight and true walls. We always increased the fasteners if needed(bowed, twisted, damaged, excessive insulation, thick strike plates.) And again, this is only one method from one person. People have to use whatever they feel comfortable doing and what their local code calls for.

AtlanticWBConst. 01-08-2008 06:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mt232 (Post 86650)
I wish my old nailed drywall had glue, or screws.....as my add a level is almost complete, almost every ceiling on the 1st floor has cracked, shifted, or at least had most nails pop out.......

That's not neccessarily a result of using screws and no glue.

If the sheetrock is tightly affixed to the framing ......and the framing settles, shrinks, moves, shifts, etc......the more damage you will have on the drywall surface.

Example: This is especially the case if you have truss systems in your ceiling and the plates flex seasonally. Tightly affixed sheetrock will get wrecked, with all kinds of cracks and popped screws.

Also Link Discussion: http://www.contractortalk.com/showth...light=adhesive

jerryh3 01-08-2008 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 86787)
That's not neccessarily a result of using screws and no glue.

If the sheetrock is tightly affixed to the framing ......and the framing settles, shrinks, moves, shifts, etc......the more damage you will have on the drywall surface.

Example: This is especially the case if you have truss systems in your ceiling and the plates flex seasonally. Tightly affixed sheetrock will get wrecked, with all kinds of cracks and popped screws.

Also Link Discussion: http://www.contractortalk.com/showth...light=adhesive

This is very true. On wide houses with truss roofs, we usually hold back the screws near the interior walls 16". This allows a little truss uplift and prevents the corner tape from splitting between the wall and ceiling. At least that's the way it's supposed to work.

jerryh3 01-08-2008 08:04 PM

2006 IRC schedule
 
1 Attachment(s)
Dusted off the 2006 IRC. Sorry for the bad scan.


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